Intra-articular repair of an isolated partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon

Seung Ho Kim, Irvin Oh, Jun Sic Park, Seong Kee Shin, Woong-Kyo Jeong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Partial-thickness tear of the subscapularis tendon in the articular surface is common. Hypothesis: Intra-articular repair of a partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon will provide a successful outcome. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 29 shoulders with an isolated partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon without another rotator cuff lesion were treated with arthroscopic intra-articular repair using suture anchors. Biceps tenodesis was performed in 16 patients. Outcomes were prospectively evaluated at a mean of 27 months (range, 19-41 months) using 3 objective (University of California at Los Angeles, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index, Simple Shoulder Test) and 2 subjective (pain and function visual analog scales) measurements. Results: There were 21 men and 8 women, with a mean age of 54 years (range, 41-65 years). Tear widths were small (<1 cm) in 16 shoulders and large (>1 cm) in 13 shoulders. Twenty-six shoulders had articular cartilage erosion on the adjacent humeral head. Lesions of the biceps tendon were noted in 25 patients (partial tear in 15 shoulders; subluxation in 13 shoulders). Shoulder pain scores improved after surgery (5.0 ± 2.7 to 0.3 ± 0.7, P < .05). According to American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index scores, 18 were excellent; 10, good; and 1, fair. Internal rotation strength deficit improved from 32% to 4%. Twenty-six patients returned to more than 90% of previous activity. There were no surgical complications; tear size and biceps tenodesis did not affect outcome (P > .05). Conclusion: Arthroscopic intra-articular repair of a partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon is an effective procedure that spares the intact tendon attachment in the bursal surface. Short-term outcomes were reliable by both objective and subjective measurements.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1825-1830
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume33
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rotator Cuff
Tears
Tendons
Joints
Tenodesis
Suture Anchors
Humeral Head
Shoulder Pain
Los Angeles
Articular Cartilage
Pain Measurement
Elbow

Keywords

  • Articular surface
  • Belly press
  • Partial tear
  • Repair
  • Subscapularis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Intra-articular repair of an isolated partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon. / Kim, Seung Ho; Oh, Irvin; Park, Jun Sic; Shin, Seong Kee; Jeong, Woong-Kyo.

In: American Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 12, 01.12.2005, p. 1825-1830.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Seung Ho ; Oh, Irvin ; Park, Jun Sic ; Shin, Seong Kee ; Jeong, Woong-Kyo. / Intra-articular repair of an isolated partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon. In: American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 33, No. 12. pp. 1825-1830.
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abstract = "Background: Partial-thickness tear of the subscapularis tendon in the articular surface is common. Hypothesis: Intra-articular repair of a partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon will provide a successful outcome. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 29 shoulders with an isolated partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon without another rotator cuff lesion were treated with arthroscopic intra-articular repair using suture anchors. Biceps tenodesis was performed in 16 patients. Outcomes were prospectively evaluated at a mean of 27 months (range, 19-41 months) using 3 objective (University of California at Los Angeles, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index, Simple Shoulder Test) and 2 subjective (pain and function visual analog scales) measurements. Results: There were 21 men and 8 women, with a mean age of 54 years (range, 41-65 years). Tear widths were small (<1 cm) in 16 shoulders and large (>1 cm) in 13 shoulders. Twenty-six shoulders had articular cartilage erosion on the adjacent humeral head. Lesions of the biceps tendon were noted in 25 patients (partial tear in 15 shoulders; subluxation in 13 shoulders). Shoulder pain scores improved after surgery (5.0 ± 2.7 to 0.3 ± 0.7, P < .05). According to American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Index scores, 18 were excellent; 10, good; and 1, fair. Internal rotation strength deficit improved from 32{\%} to 4{\%}. Twenty-six patients returned to more than 90{\%} of previous activity. There were no surgical complications; tear size and biceps tenodesis did not affect outcome (P > .05). Conclusion: Arthroscopic intra-articular repair of a partial articular-surface tear of the subscapularis tendon is an effective procedure that spares the intact tendon attachment in the bursal surface. Short-term outcomes were reliable by both objective and subjective measurements.",
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