Intrathecal transplantation of autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treating spinal cord injury: A human trial

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Abstract

Context: Spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause irreversible damage to neural tissues. However, there is currently no effective treatment for SCI. The therapeutic potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) has been emerged. Objective: We evaluated the effects and safety of the intrathecal transplantation of autologous ADMSCs in patients with SCI. Participants/Interventions: Fourteen patients with SCI were enrolled (12 for ASIA A, 1 for B, and 1 for D; duration of impairments 3–28 months). Six patients were injured at cervical, 1 at cervico-thoracic, 6 at thoracic, and 1 at lumbar level. Autologous ADMSCs were isolated from lipoaspirates of patients’ subcutaneous fat tissue and 9 × 107 ADMSCs per patient were administered intrathecally through lumbar tapping. MRI, hematological parameters, electrophysiology studies, and ASIA motor/sensory scores were assessed before and after transplantation. Results: ASIA motor scores were improved in 5 patients at 8 months follow-up (1–2 grades at some myotomes). Voluntary anal contraction improvement was seen in 2 patients. ASIA sensory score recovery was seen in 10, although degeneration was seen in 1. In somatosensory evoked potential test, one patient showed median nerve improvement. There was no interval change of MRI between baseline and 8 months post-transplantation. Four adverse events were observed in three patients: urinary tract infection, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusions: Over the 8 months of follow-up, intrathecal transplantation of autologous ADMSCs for SCI was free of serious adverse events, and several patients showed mild improvements in neurological function. Patient selection, dosage, and delivery method of ADMSCs should be investigated further.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-664
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Spinal Cord Medicine
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Autologous Transplantation
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Spinal Cord Injuries
Thorax
Transplantation
Somatosensory Evoked Potentials
Median Nerve
Electrophysiology
Subcutaneous Fat
Subcutaneous Tissue
Urinary Tract Infections
Nausea
Patient Selection
Vomiting
Headache
Safety

Keywords

  • Adipose tissue
  • Autologous
  • Intrathecal
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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title = "Intrathecal transplantation of autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treating spinal cord injury: A human trial",
abstract = "Context: Spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause irreversible damage to neural tissues. However, there is currently no effective treatment for SCI. The therapeutic potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) has been emerged. Objective: We evaluated the effects and safety of the intrathecal transplantation of autologous ADMSCs in patients with SCI. Participants/Interventions: Fourteen patients with SCI were enrolled (12 for ASIA A, 1 for B, and 1 for D; duration of impairments 3–28 months). Six patients were injured at cervical, 1 at cervico-thoracic, 6 at thoracic, and 1 at lumbar level. Autologous ADMSCs were isolated from lipoaspirates of patients’ subcutaneous fat tissue and 9 × 107 ADMSCs per patient were administered intrathecally through lumbar tapping. MRI, hematological parameters, electrophysiology studies, and ASIA motor/sensory scores were assessed before and after transplantation. Results: ASIA motor scores were improved in 5 patients at 8 months follow-up (1–2 grades at some myotomes). Voluntary anal contraction improvement was seen in 2 patients. ASIA sensory score recovery was seen in 10, although degeneration was seen in 1. In somatosensory evoked potential test, one patient showed median nerve improvement. There was no interval change of MRI between baseline and 8 months post-transplantation. Four adverse events were observed in three patients: urinary tract infection, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusions: Over the 8 months of follow-up, intrathecal transplantation of autologous ADMSCs for SCI was free of serious adverse events, and several patients showed mild improvements in neurological function. Patient selection, dosage, and delivery method of ADMSCs should be investigated further.",
keywords = "Adipose tissue, Autologous, Intrathecal, Mesenchymal stem cells, Spinal cord injury, Transplantation",
author = "Hur, {Junseok W.} and Cho, {Tai Hyoung} and Dong-Hyuk Park and Lee, {Jang Bo} and Park, {Jung Yul} and Chung, {Yong Gu}",
year = "2016",
month = "11",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Intrathecal transplantation of autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treating spinal cord injury

T2 - A human trial

AU - Hur, Junseok W.

AU - Cho, Tai Hyoung

AU - Park, Dong-Hyuk

AU - Lee, Jang Bo

AU - Park, Jung Yul

AU - Chung, Yong Gu

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Context: Spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause irreversible damage to neural tissues. However, there is currently no effective treatment for SCI. The therapeutic potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) has been emerged. Objective: We evaluated the effects and safety of the intrathecal transplantation of autologous ADMSCs in patients with SCI. Participants/Interventions: Fourteen patients with SCI were enrolled (12 for ASIA A, 1 for B, and 1 for D; duration of impairments 3–28 months). Six patients were injured at cervical, 1 at cervico-thoracic, 6 at thoracic, and 1 at lumbar level. Autologous ADMSCs were isolated from lipoaspirates of patients’ subcutaneous fat tissue and 9 × 107 ADMSCs per patient were administered intrathecally through lumbar tapping. MRI, hematological parameters, electrophysiology studies, and ASIA motor/sensory scores were assessed before and after transplantation. Results: ASIA motor scores were improved in 5 patients at 8 months follow-up (1–2 grades at some myotomes). Voluntary anal contraction improvement was seen in 2 patients. ASIA sensory score recovery was seen in 10, although degeneration was seen in 1. In somatosensory evoked potential test, one patient showed median nerve improvement. There was no interval change of MRI between baseline and 8 months post-transplantation. Four adverse events were observed in three patients: urinary tract infection, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusions: Over the 8 months of follow-up, intrathecal transplantation of autologous ADMSCs for SCI was free of serious adverse events, and several patients showed mild improvements in neurological function. Patient selection, dosage, and delivery method of ADMSCs should be investigated further.

AB - Context: Spinal cord injury (SCI) can cause irreversible damage to neural tissues. However, there is currently no effective treatment for SCI. The therapeutic potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) has been emerged. Objective: We evaluated the effects and safety of the intrathecal transplantation of autologous ADMSCs in patients with SCI. Participants/Interventions: Fourteen patients with SCI were enrolled (12 for ASIA A, 1 for B, and 1 for D; duration of impairments 3–28 months). Six patients were injured at cervical, 1 at cervico-thoracic, 6 at thoracic, and 1 at lumbar level. Autologous ADMSCs were isolated from lipoaspirates of patients’ subcutaneous fat tissue and 9 × 107 ADMSCs per patient were administered intrathecally through lumbar tapping. MRI, hematological parameters, electrophysiology studies, and ASIA motor/sensory scores were assessed before and after transplantation. Results: ASIA motor scores were improved in 5 patients at 8 months follow-up (1–2 grades at some myotomes). Voluntary anal contraction improvement was seen in 2 patients. ASIA sensory score recovery was seen in 10, although degeneration was seen in 1. In somatosensory evoked potential test, one patient showed median nerve improvement. There was no interval change of MRI between baseline and 8 months post-transplantation. Four adverse events were observed in three patients: urinary tract infection, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusions: Over the 8 months of follow-up, intrathecal transplantation of autologous ADMSCs for SCI was free of serious adverse events, and several patients showed mild improvements in neurological function. Patient selection, dosage, and delivery method of ADMSCs should be investigated further.

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KW - Spinal cord injury

KW - Transplantation

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