Invasive plant-derived biochar inhibits sulfamethazine uptake by lettuce in soil

Anushka Upamali Rajapaksha, Meththika Vithanage, Jung Eun Lim, Mohamed Bedair M. Ahmed, Ming Zhang, Sang Soo Lee, Yong Sik Ok

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Veterinary antibiotics are frequently detected in soils posing potential contamination of food crops. Sulfamethazine (SMT) uptake was investigated by lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown in the soils treated with/without biochar derived from an invasive plant, burcucumber (Sicyos angulatus L.) (BBC700). Soils were contaminated with SMT at 5 and 50mgkg-1, and treated with/without 5% BBC700 (ww-1). The lettuces were harvested after 5weeks of cultivation and were analyzed for SMT by a high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction. With 5% BBC700, the uptake of SMT was reduced by 86% in the soil spiked with 5mgkg-1 SMT compared to the control whereas a 63% reduction was observed in the soil spiked with 50mgkg-1 SMT. Application of BBC700, into soils effectively reduced the SMT uptake by lettuce.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)500-504
Number of pages5
JournalChemosphere
Volume111
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sulfamethazine
Soils
soil
antibiotics
liquid chromatography
High performance liquid chromatography
mass spectrometry
biochar
Crops
Mass spectrometry
crop
food
Contamination
Anti-Bacterial Agents

Keywords

  • Availability
  • Black carbon
  • Charcoal
  • Pharmaceuticals
  • Soil amendment
  • Sulfonamides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Rajapaksha, A. U., Vithanage, M., Lim, J. E., Ahmed, M. B. M., Zhang, M., Lee, S. S., & Ok, Y. S. (2014). Invasive plant-derived biochar inhibits sulfamethazine uptake by lettuce in soil. Chemosphere, 111, 500-504. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.04.040

Invasive plant-derived biochar inhibits sulfamethazine uptake by lettuce in soil. / Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Vithanage, Meththika; Lim, Jung Eun; Ahmed, Mohamed Bedair M.; Zhang, Ming; Lee, Sang Soo; Ok, Yong Sik.

In: Chemosphere, Vol. 111, 01.01.2014, p. 500-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rajapaksha, AU, Vithanage, M, Lim, JE, Ahmed, MBM, Zhang, M, Lee, SS & Ok, YS 2014, 'Invasive plant-derived biochar inhibits sulfamethazine uptake by lettuce in soil', Chemosphere, vol. 111, pp. 500-504. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.04.040
Rajapaksha AU, Vithanage M, Lim JE, Ahmed MBM, Zhang M, Lee SS et al. Invasive plant-derived biochar inhibits sulfamethazine uptake by lettuce in soil. Chemosphere. 2014 Jan 1;111:500-504. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.04.040
Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali ; Vithanage, Meththika ; Lim, Jung Eun ; Ahmed, Mohamed Bedair M. ; Zhang, Ming ; Lee, Sang Soo ; Ok, Yong Sik. / Invasive plant-derived biochar inhibits sulfamethazine uptake by lettuce in soil. In: Chemosphere. 2014 ; Vol. 111. pp. 500-504.
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