Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus processivity factor (PF-8) recruits cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase CHFR to promote PARP1 degradation and lytic replication

Woo Chang Chung, Seungrae Lee, Yejin Kim, Jong Bok Seo, Moon Jung Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), which belongs to the gammaherpesvirus subfamily, is associated with the pathogenesis of various tumors. Nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the polymerization of ADP-ribose units on target proteins. In KSHV-infected cells, PARP1 inhibits replication and transcription activator (RTA), a molecular switch that initiates lytic replication, through direct interaction. Thus, for efficient replication, KSHV has to overcome the molecular barrier in the form of PARP1. Previously, we have demonstrated that KSHV downregulates the expression of PARP1 through PF-8, a viral processivity factor. PF-8 induces ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation of PARP1 via direct physical association and enhances RTA transactivation activity. Here, we showed that dimerization domains of PF-8 are crucial not only for PARP1 interaction and degradation but also for enhancement of the RTA transactivation activity. PF-8 recruited CHFR for the PARP1 degradation. A knockdown of CHFR attenuated the PF-8-induced PARP1 degradation and enhancement of the RTA transactivation activity, leading to reduced KSHV lytic replication. These findings reveal a mechanism by which KSHV PF-8 recruits a cellular E3 ligase to curtail the inhibitory effect of PARP1 on KSHV lytic replication.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1009261
JournalPLoS Pathogens
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Jan 28

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Virology

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