Lactobacillus-fermented milk products attenuate bone loss in an experimental rat model of ovariectomy-induced post-menopausal primary osteoporosis

C. S. Lee, J. Y. Kim, B. K. Kim, I. O. Lee, N. H. Park, S. H. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: In this study, we investigated the anti-osteoporotic effect of two fermented milk products (FMPs) fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum A41 and Lactobacillus fermentum SRK414 on a rat model of ovariectomy-induced post-menopausal primary osteoporosis. Methods and Results: The two Lactobacillus FMPs increased the bone volume and bone mineral density (BMD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats, and normalized the bone biomarkers in the serum. Additionally, they altered the gene expression levels of bone-metabolism-related markers. Furthermore, the two Lactobacillus FMPs downregulated bone-apoptosis-related genes stimulated by ovariectomy. Interestingly, the Lactobacillus FMPs decreased the levels of inflammation markers in the serum, bone, ileum and colon of the rats. Gut bacterial populations were also affected upon FMP treatment due to increase in the abundance of the genus Lactobacillus and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. Conclusions: Milk products fermented by L. plantarum A41 and L. fermentum SRK414 can exhibit anti-osteoporotic effects on post-menopausal osteoporosis via regulating the expression of bone-metabolism-related markers. Significance and Impact of the Study: The two Lactobacillus FMPs used in the study can be an ideal method that has its potential of treating post-menopausal osteoporosis instead of drug treatments.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Applied Microbiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • fermented foods
  • gene expression
  • lactic acid bacteria
  • Lactobacillus
  • osteoporosis
  • probiotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Lactobacillus-fermented milk products attenuate bone loss in an experimental rat model of ovariectomy-induced post-menopausal primary osteoporosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this