Laser resurfacing of smallpox scars

Dong Hee Kang, Seung Ha Park, Sang Hwan Koo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: At the beginning of the twentieth century, smallpox affected every continent and country in the world, but over the first half of the twentieth century this disease was eliminated in most countries, including Korea, thanks to the World Health Organization's eradication program. Most survivors of smallpox have facial scars with a distinct cobblestone appearance. Though most smallpox scar patients want smooth skin, it is difficult to achieve good results with dermabrasion or chemical peeling. Recently, with advances in laser technology, laser resurfacing has become more effective and safer than conventional methods because of its depth control precision. Methods: Between September of 1996 and August of 2001, 76 patients with significant smallpox scars were treated with a high-powered carbon dioxide laser at Korea University's Anam Medical Center. Different resurfacing methods, such as even-depth resurfacing, the shoulder technique, and the laser punch-out method, were applied according to the depth and pattern of the scars. Results: The authors found that 54 patients (71 percent) had excellent or good results. The sharply demarcated margins of the smallpox scars faded out, and the depth and width of the depressed scars improved in most patients. Only seven patients sustained hypertrophic scarring after laser resurfacing, but this was resolved by intradermal triamcinolone injections. Prolonged erythema occurred in six patients (7.9 percent) and hyperpigmentation occurred in 15 (19.7 percent), but the erythema disappeared spontaneously and the hyperpigmentation could be readily managed with postoperative skin care. Conclusion: Laser resurfacing was found to be a useful treatment method for smallpox scarring.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-265
Number of pages7
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume116
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jul 1

Fingerprint

Smallpox
Cicatrix
Lasers
Hyperpigmentation
Erythema
Korea
Dermabrasion
Skin Care
Triamcinolone
Intradermal Injections
Gas Lasers
Postoperative Care
Survivors
Technology
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Laser resurfacing of smallpox scars. / Kang, Dong Hee; Park, Seung Ha; Koo, Sang Hwan.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 116, No. 1, 01.07.2005, p. 259-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kang, Dong Hee ; Park, Seung Ha ; Koo, Sang Hwan. / Laser resurfacing of smallpox scars. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2005 ; Vol. 116, No. 1. pp. 259-265.
@article{cb12fb0a66a94776a3d907b14129fe4c,
title = "Laser resurfacing of smallpox scars",
abstract = "Background: At the beginning of the twentieth century, smallpox affected every continent and country in the world, but over the first half of the twentieth century this disease was eliminated in most countries, including Korea, thanks to the World Health Organization's eradication program. Most survivors of smallpox have facial scars with a distinct cobblestone appearance. Though most smallpox scar patients want smooth skin, it is difficult to achieve good results with dermabrasion or chemical peeling. Recently, with advances in laser technology, laser resurfacing has become more effective and safer than conventional methods because of its depth control precision. Methods: Between September of 1996 and August of 2001, 76 patients with significant smallpox scars were treated with a high-powered carbon dioxide laser at Korea University's Anam Medical Center. Different resurfacing methods, such as even-depth resurfacing, the shoulder technique, and the laser punch-out method, were applied according to the depth and pattern of the scars. Results: The authors found that 54 patients (71 percent) had excellent or good results. The sharply demarcated margins of the smallpox scars faded out, and the depth and width of the depressed scars improved in most patients. Only seven patients sustained hypertrophic scarring after laser resurfacing, but this was resolved by intradermal triamcinolone injections. Prolonged erythema occurred in six patients (7.9 percent) and hyperpigmentation occurred in 15 (19.7 percent), but the erythema disappeared spontaneously and the hyperpigmentation could be readily managed with postoperative skin care. Conclusion: Laser resurfacing was found to be a useful treatment method for smallpox scarring.",
author = "Kang, {Dong Hee} and Park, {Seung Ha} and Koo, {Sang Hwan}",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/01.PRS.0000170093.62733.E5",
language = "English",
volume = "116",
pages = "259--265",
journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
issn = "0032-1052",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Laser resurfacing of smallpox scars

AU - Kang, Dong Hee

AU - Park, Seung Ha

AU - Koo, Sang Hwan

PY - 2005/7/1

Y1 - 2005/7/1

N2 - Background: At the beginning of the twentieth century, smallpox affected every continent and country in the world, but over the first half of the twentieth century this disease was eliminated in most countries, including Korea, thanks to the World Health Organization's eradication program. Most survivors of smallpox have facial scars with a distinct cobblestone appearance. Though most smallpox scar patients want smooth skin, it is difficult to achieve good results with dermabrasion or chemical peeling. Recently, with advances in laser technology, laser resurfacing has become more effective and safer than conventional methods because of its depth control precision. Methods: Between September of 1996 and August of 2001, 76 patients with significant smallpox scars were treated with a high-powered carbon dioxide laser at Korea University's Anam Medical Center. Different resurfacing methods, such as even-depth resurfacing, the shoulder technique, and the laser punch-out method, were applied according to the depth and pattern of the scars. Results: The authors found that 54 patients (71 percent) had excellent or good results. The sharply demarcated margins of the smallpox scars faded out, and the depth and width of the depressed scars improved in most patients. Only seven patients sustained hypertrophic scarring after laser resurfacing, but this was resolved by intradermal triamcinolone injections. Prolonged erythema occurred in six patients (7.9 percent) and hyperpigmentation occurred in 15 (19.7 percent), but the erythema disappeared spontaneously and the hyperpigmentation could be readily managed with postoperative skin care. Conclusion: Laser resurfacing was found to be a useful treatment method for smallpox scarring.

AB - Background: At the beginning of the twentieth century, smallpox affected every continent and country in the world, but over the first half of the twentieth century this disease was eliminated in most countries, including Korea, thanks to the World Health Organization's eradication program. Most survivors of smallpox have facial scars with a distinct cobblestone appearance. Though most smallpox scar patients want smooth skin, it is difficult to achieve good results with dermabrasion or chemical peeling. Recently, with advances in laser technology, laser resurfacing has become more effective and safer than conventional methods because of its depth control precision. Methods: Between September of 1996 and August of 2001, 76 patients with significant smallpox scars were treated with a high-powered carbon dioxide laser at Korea University's Anam Medical Center. Different resurfacing methods, such as even-depth resurfacing, the shoulder technique, and the laser punch-out method, were applied according to the depth and pattern of the scars. Results: The authors found that 54 patients (71 percent) had excellent or good results. The sharply demarcated margins of the smallpox scars faded out, and the depth and width of the depressed scars improved in most patients. Only seven patients sustained hypertrophic scarring after laser resurfacing, but this was resolved by intradermal triamcinolone injections. Prolonged erythema occurred in six patients (7.9 percent) and hyperpigmentation occurred in 15 (19.7 percent), but the erythema disappeared spontaneously and the hyperpigmentation could be readily managed with postoperative skin care. Conclusion: Laser resurfacing was found to be a useful treatment method for smallpox scarring.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=21744445900&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=21744445900&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/01.PRS.0000170093.62733.E5

DO - 10.1097/01.PRS.0000170093.62733.E5

M3 - Article

VL - 116

SP - 259

EP - 265

JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SN - 0032-1052

IS - 1

ER -