Ldb1 Is Essential for the Development of Isthmic Organizer and Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

Soojin Kim, Yangu Zhao, Ja Myong Lee, Woon Ryoung Kim, Marat Gorivodsky, Heiner Westphal, Dongho Geum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

LIM domain-binding protein 1 (Ldb1) is a nuclear cofactor that interacts with LIM homeodomain proteins to form multiprotein complexes that are important for transcription regulation. Ldb1 has been shown to play essential roles in various processes during mouse embryogenesis. To determine the role of Ldb1 in mid- and hindbrain development, we have generated a conditional mutant with a specific deletion of the Ldb1 in the Engrailed-1-expressing region of the developing mid- and hindbrain. Our study showed that the deletion impaired the expression of signaling molecules, such as fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) and Wnt1, in the isthmic organizer and the expression of Shh in the ventral midbrain. The midbrain and the cerebellum were severely reduced in size, and the midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons were missing in the mutant. These defects are identical to the phenotype that has been observed previously in mice with a deletion of the LIM homeodomain gene Lmx1b. Our results thus provide genetic evidence supporting that Ldb1 and Lmx1b function cooperatively to regulate mid- and hindbrain development. In addition, we found that mouse embryonic stem cells lacking Ldb1 failed to generate several types of differentiated neurons, including the mDA neurons, serotonergic neurons, cholinergic neurons, and olfactory bulb neurons, indicating an essential cell-autonomous role for Ldb1 in the development of these neurons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)986-994
Number of pages9
JournalStem Cells and Development
Volume25
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jul 1

Fingerprint

LIM Domain Proteins
Dopaminergic Neurons
Mesencephalon
Neurons
Carrier Proteins
Rhombencephalon
LIM-Homeodomain Proteins
Fibroblast Growth Factor 8
Serotonergic Neurons
Multiprotein Complexes
Cholinergic Neurons
Olfactory Bulb
Transcription
Stem cells
Cerebellum
Cholinergic Agents
Embryonic Development
Genes
Phenotype
Defects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Ldb1 Is Essential for the Development of Isthmic Organizer and Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons. / Kim, Soojin; Zhao, Yangu; Lee, Ja Myong; Kim, Woon Ryoung; Gorivodsky, Marat; Westphal, Heiner; Geum, Dongho.

In: Stem Cells and Development, Vol. 25, No. 13, 01.07.2016, p. 986-994.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Soojin ; Zhao, Yangu ; Lee, Ja Myong ; Kim, Woon Ryoung ; Gorivodsky, Marat ; Westphal, Heiner ; Geum, Dongho. / Ldb1 Is Essential for the Development of Isthmic Organizer and Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons. In: Stem Cells and Development. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 13. pp. 986-994.
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