Leaf flushing and shedding, bud and flower production, and stem elongation in tall birch trees subjected to increases in aboveground temperature

Masahiro Nakamura, Kobayashi Makoto, Motonobu Tanaka, Taiki Inoue, Yo Whan Son, Tsutom Hiura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Key message: Tall birch trees allocate extra resource due to aboveground temperature elevation to bud and male flower production rather than to plant growth. Saplings increased only plant growth under warming. Size-dependent response should be considered.Abstract: We experimentally heated canopy organs of tall birch trees (Betula ermanii Cham.; 18–20 m high) growing at a high latitude to determine how leaf phenology, plant growth, and bud and male flower production might shift in response to increases in aboveground temperature during global climate change. We warmed the canopies with infrared heat lamps fixed to steel pipe scaffolds built around the trees. The temperature of the warmed canopies increased by approximately 1 °C. Warming extended the length of the growing season of canopy leaves (by accelerating leaf flush and delaying leaf fall), and significantly increased the numbers of buds and male flowers per shoot. Bud production and shoot length were positively correlated in both warmed and control branches. However, warming did not increase canopy shoot lengths. The intercept value of the positive regression slope between bud production and shoot length for warmed branches was higher than that for control branches. Thus, canopy warming had a direct positive effect on the bud production but had no indirect effect via increases in shoot length. Our experiment showed that tall birch trees allocated extra resources made available by increased aboveground temperature to bud and male flower production rather than to plant growth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalTrees - Structure and Function
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016 Mar 24

Fingerprint

Betula
stem elongation
flushing
bud
flower
buds
stem
male flowers
flowers
canopy
Temperature
shoot
Growth
warming
leaves
shoots
plant growth
temperature
Plant Leaves
Climate Change

Keywords

  • Extra resources
  • Infrared ray lamp
  • Leaf fall
  • Leaf flush
  • Size-dependent response
  • Steel pipe scaffolds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Plant Science
  • Physiology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Leaf flushing and shedding, bud and flower production, and stem elongation in tall birch trees subjected to increases in aboveground temperature. / Nakamura, Masahiro; Makoto, Kobayashi; Tanaka, Motonobu; Inoue, Taiki; Son, Yo Whan; Hiura, Tsutom.

In: Trees - Structure and Function, 24.03.2016, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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