Learning new sensorimotor contingencies: Effects of long-term use of sensory augmentation on the brain and conscious perception

Sabine U. König, Frank Schumann, Johannes Keyser, Caspar Goeke, Carina Krause, Susan Wache, Aleksey Lytochkin, Manuel Ebert, Vincent Brunsch, Basil Wahn, Kai Kaspar, Saskia K. Nagel, Tobias Meilinger, Heinrich Bulthoff, Thomas Wolbers, Christian Büchel, Peter König

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Theories of embodied cognition propose that perception is shaped by sensory stimuli and by the actions of the organism. Following sensorimotor contingency theory, the mastery of lawful relations between own behavior and resulting changes in sensory signals, called sensorimotor contingencies, is constitutive of conscious perception. Sensorimotor contingency theory predicts that, after training, knowledge relating to new sensorimotor contingencies develops, leading to changes in the activation of sensorimotor systems, and concomitant changes in perception. In the present study, we spell out this hypothesis in detail and investigate whether it is possible to learn new sensorimotor contingencies by sensory augmentation. Specifically, we designed an fMRI compatible sensory augmentation device, the feelSpace belt, which gives orientation information about the direction of magnetic north via vibrotactile stimulation on the waist of participants. In a longitudinal study, participants trained with this belt for seven weeks in natural environment. Our EEG results indicate that training with the belt leads to changes in sleep architecture early in the training phase, compatible with the consolidation of procedural learning as well as increased sensorimotor processing and motor programming. The fMRI results suggest that training entails activity in sensory as well as higher motor centers and brain areas known to be involved in navigation. These neural changes are accompanied with changes in how space and the belt signal are perceived, as well as with increased trust in navigational ability. Thus, our data on physiological processes and subjective experiences are compatible with the hypothesis that new sensorimotor contingencies can be acquired using sensory augmentation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0166647
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

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long term effects
Brain
learning
Learning
brain
waist
longitudinal studies
sleep
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
cognition
Physiological Phenomena
Aptitude
Cognition
Longitudinal Studies
Electroencephalography
organisms
Sleep
Teaching
Consolidation
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

König, S. U., Schumann, F., Keyser, J., Goeke, C., Krause, C., Wache, S., ... König, P. (2016). Learning new sensorimotor contingencies: Effects of long-term use of sensory augmentation on the brain and conscious perception. PLoS One, 11(12), [e0166647]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0166647

Learning new sensorimotor contingencies : Effects of long-term use of sensory augmentation on the brain and conscious perception. / König, Sabine U.; Schumann, Frank; Keyser, Johannes; Goeke, Caspar; Krause, Carina; Wache, Susan; Lytochkin, Aleksey; Ebert, Manuel; Brunsch, Vincent; Wahn, Basil; Kaspar, Kai; Nagel, Saskia K.; Meilinger, Tobias; Bulthoff, Heinrich; Wolbers, Thomas; Büchel, Christian; König, Peter.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 12, e0166647, 01.12.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

König, SU, Schumann, F, Keyser, J, Goeke, C, Krause, C, Wache, S, Lytochkin, A, Ebert, M, Brunsch, V, Wahn, B, Kaspar, K, Nagel, SK, Meilinger, T, Bulthoff, H, Wolbers, T, Büchel, C & König, P 2016, 'Learning new sensorimotor contingencies: Effects of long-term use of sensory augmentation on the brain and conscious perception', PLoS One, vol. 11, no. 12, e0166647. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0166647
König, Sabine U. ; Schumann, Frank ; Keyser, Johannes ; Goeke, Caspar ; Krause, Carina ; Wache, Susan ; Lytochkin, Aleksey ; Ebert, Manuel ; Brunsch, Vincent ; Wahn, Basil ; Kaspar, Kai ; Nagel, Saskia K. ; Meilinger, Tobias ; Bulthoff, Heinrich ; Wolbers, Thomas ; Büchel, Christian ; König, Peter. / Learning new sensorimotor contingencies : Effects of long-term use of sensory augmentation on the brain and conscious perception. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 12.
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