Lesional location of lateral medullary infarction presenting hiccups (singultus)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hiccups are an infrequent result of lateral medullary infarction. Their importance may be underestimated and they can cause distress, exhaustion, and aspiration. Hiccups in lateral medullary infarction remain poorly understood Objective: To evaluate the relation between the lesional loci of lateral medullary infarction and hiccups. Methods: 51 patients with lateral medullary infarction were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging within three days of the onset of infarction. Seven of the 51 patients developed hiccup. Results: All patients with hiccups had middle level lateral medullary lesions, including two with lower level lesions and four with upper level lesions. In the middle level lateral medullary lesions, dorsolateral lesions were most often involved. All patients with lateral medullary infarction presenting with hiccups also had vertigo, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and dysphagia. Conclusions: The observations suggest that middle level and dorsolateral lesion locations in lateral medullary infarction frequently induce hiccups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-98
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume76
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1

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Hiccup
Infarction
Vertigo
Dizziness
Deglutition Disorders
Nausea
Vomiting
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Lesional location of lateral medullary infarction presenting hiccups (singultus). / Park, Moon Ho; Kim, Byung Jo; Koh, Seong Beom; Park, M. K.; Park, Kun Woo; Lee, Dae Hie.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 76, No. 1, 01.01.2005, p. 95-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Hiccups are an infrequent result of lateral medullary infarction. Their importance may be underestimated and they can cause distress, exhaustion, and aspiration. Hiccups in lateral medullary infarction remain poorly understood Objective: To evaluate the relation between the lesional loci of lateral medullary infarction and hiccups. Methods: 51 patients with lateral medullary infarction were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging within three days of the onset of infarction. Seven of the 51 patients developed hiccup. Results: All patients with hiccups had middle level lateral medullary lesions, including two with lower level lesions and four with upper level lesions. In the middle level lateral medullary lesions, dorsolateral lesions were most often involved. All patients with lateral medullary infarction presenting with hiccups also had vertigo, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and dysphagia. Conclusions: The observations suggest that middle level and dorsolateral lesion locations in lateral medullary infarction frequently induce hiccups.",
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AU - Koh, Seong Beom

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AU - Park, Kun Woo

AU - Lee, Dae Hie

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N2 - Background: Hiccups are an infrequent result of lateral medullary infarction. Their importance may be underestimated and they can cause distress, exhaustion, and aspiration. Hiccups in lateral medullary infarction remain poorly understood Objective: To evaluate the relation between the lesional loci of lateral medullary infarction and hiccups. Methods: 51 patients with lateral medullary infarction were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging within three days of the onset of infarction. Seven of the 51 patients developed hiccup. Results: All patients with hiccups had middle level lateral medullary lesions, including two with lower level lesions and four with upper level lesions. In the middle level lateral medullary lesions, dorsolateral lesions were most often involved. All patients with lateral medullary infarction presenting with hiccups also had vertigo, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and dysphagia. Conclusions: The observations suggest that middle level and dorsolateral lesion locations in lateral medullary infarction frequently induce hiccups.

AB - Background: Hiccups are an infrequent result of lateral medullary infarction. Their importance may be underestimated and they can cause distress, exhaustion, and aspiration. Hiccups in lateral medullary infarction remain poorly understood Objective: To evaluate the relation between the lesional loci of lateral medullary infarction and hiccups. Methods: 51 patients with lateral medullary infarction were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging within three days of the onset of infarction. Seven of the 51 patients developed hiccup. Results: All patients with hiccups had middle level lateral medullary lesions, including two with lower level lesions and four with upper level lesions. In the middle level lateral medullary lesions, dorsolateral lesions were most often involved. All patients with lateral medullary infarction presenting with hiccups also had vertigo, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and dysphagia. Conclusions: The observations suggest that middle level and dorsolateral lesion locations in lateral medullary infarction frequently induce hiccups.

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