Lesional location of lateral medullary infarction presenting hiccups (singultus)

M. H. Park, B. J. Kim, S. B. Koh, M. K. Park, K. W. Park, Dae Hie Lee

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    41 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Hiccups are an infrequent result of lateral medullary infarction. Their importance may be underestimated and they can cause distress, exhaustion, and aspiration. Hiccups in lateral medullary infarction remain poorly understood Objective: To evaluate the relation between the lesional loci of lateral medullary infarction and hiccups. Methods: 51 patients with lateral medullary infarction were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging within three days of the onset of infarction. Seven of the 51 patients developed hiccup. Results: All patients with hiccups had middle level lateral medullary lesions, including two with lower level lesions and four with upper level lesions. In the middle level lateral medullary lesions, dorsolateral lesions were most often involved. All patients with lateral medullary infarction presenting with hiccups also had vertigo, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and dysphagia. Conclusions: The observations suggest that middle level and dorsolateral lesion locations in lateral medullary infarction frequently induce hiccups.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)95-98
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
    Volume76
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Surgery
    • Clinical Neurology
    • Psychiatry and Mental health

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