Life history differences of Psilotreta locumtenens (Trichoptera: Odontoceridae) in two reaches of a mountain stream in Korea

Ye Ji Seo, Dong Gun Kim, Min Jeong Baek, Yeon Jae Bae

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The life history traits of the caddisfly, Psilotreta locumtenensBotosaneanu (Odontoceridae), were studied in two stream reaches with different thermal ranges (main and branch streams) of the Gapyeong Stream, a typical mountain stream located in the central Korean Peninsula. Psilotreta locumtenens larvae were quantitatively sampled monthly from November 2008 to July 2010, and biweekly during the emergence period (late April to early July), using a Surber sampler (30 × 30cm). Adults were quantitatively sampled with a sweep net. Larval density in the main stream (324.21 ± 38.59m-2) was higher than that in the branch stream (60.48 ± 10.86m-2). The larvae hatched in the early summer and overwintered as 5th and 3rd instars in the main and branch streams, respectively. The emergence peak at the main stream was approximately 2 weeks earlier. The sex ratio at both sites was approximately 0.3. The life history in both streams was univoltine. Secondary production in the main stream was much higher than in the branch stream, owing to high larval densities, and the P/B ratios at the two sites were similar. This study demonstrated remarkable differences in larval growth patterns and emergence peaks in P.locumtenens between the two stream reaches due to differences in accumulated degree days (230.30 DD) and other phenological cues such as daily mean threshold water temperature (9°C) during the ascending phase, despite their relatively small mean annual water temperature difference of 0.58°C.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-301
Number of pages9
JournalEntomological Research
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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