Long-term use of renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors after acute myocardial infarction is not associated with survival benefits: Analysis of data from the Korean acute myocardial infarction registry-national institutes of health registry

the KAMIR-NIH Registry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Renin-angiotensin-system inhibitors (RASi) have shown survival benefits after acute myocardial infarction (MI), but the role of routine long-term use of RASi remains unclear. Thereby, we explored the therapeutic effects of RASi medication at 1-year follow-up from acute MI. Methods: Using the nationwide Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry-National Institutes of Health (KAMIR-NIH) registry, we included and analyzed 10,822 subjects. Patients were stratified into those taking RASi at 1-year follow-up (n = 7,696) and those not taking RASi at 1-year follow-up (n = 3,126). Patients were followed up for 2-years from the 1-year follow-up; 2-year all-cause mortality and cardiac mortality were analyzed as primary and secondary outcomes, respectively. Results: The use of RASi at 1-year follow-up was not associated with decreased all-cause mortality (log-rank P = 0.195) or cardiac mortality (log-rank P = 0.337). In multivariate analyses, RASi medication at 1-year follow-up did not reduce all-cause mortality (P = 0.758) or cardiac mortality (P = 0.923), while RASi medication at discharge substantially reduced 1-year all-cause and cardiac mortality. Treatment with either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker at 1-year follow-up did not show survival benefits from 1-year follow-up, respectively. The use of RASi at 1-year follow-up did not show a prognostic interaction between previous history of chronic kidney disease, post-MI acute heart failure, concomitant use of beta-blockers at 1-year follow-up, or 1-year LVEF. Conclusion: Acute MI patients taking RASi at 1-year follow-up were not associated with improved 2-year all-cause mortality or cardiac mortality from the 1-year follow-up. This study provides valuable information regarding tailored medication strategy after acute MI. Clinical trial registration: [www.ClinicalTrials.gov], identifier [KCT0000863].

Original languageEnglish
Article number994419
JournalFrontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Aug 31
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • acute myocardial infarction
  • angiotensin II receptor blocker
  • angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor
  • mortality
  • prognosis
  • renin-angiotensin-system inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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