Lower urinary tract symptoms in male patients with stroke: A nationwide population-based study

Jae Ho Chung, Jung Bin Kim, Ji Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background and objectives: There is a scarcity of large population-based studies investigating lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) in stroke survivors. We investigated the prevalence and severity of LUTS in male stroke survivors and determined the independent effect of stroke on LUTS using data from a nationwide population-based survey. Methods: Cross-sectional data obtained from the 2011 Korean Community Health Survey were analyzed. The prevalence and severity of LUTS were compared between 1936 male stroke patients and 90,506 male non-stroke participants. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify the independent effect of stroke on LUTS. Results: Male stroke patients more frequently reported both storage symptoms (frequency, urgency, and nocturia) and voiding symptoms (straining, weak stream, intermittency, and incomplete emptying) compared to male non-stroke population. The storage and voiding subscores of IPSS and quality of life score were higher in male stroke patients than in male non-stroke population. Multivariable logistic regression adjusted for age, socioeconomic factors, physical and mental health measures, and comorbidities, found stroke to be an independent risk factor for all 7 symptoms of LUTS. Conclusion: The present study confirmed a high prevalence of LUTS in male stroke survivors that cannot be attributed only to potential confounders, implying that stroke may independently contribute to the development of LUTS. Our findings warrant the need for timely detection by physicians and proper management of LUTS to promote functional outcomes and quality of life in stroke population.

Original languageEnglish
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
stroke
Stroke
Population
Survivors
Prostate
quality of life
Logistic Models
logistics
Quality of Life
Nocturia
regression
Age Factors
socioeconomic factors
comorbidity
Health Surveys
Comorbidity
Mental Health
mental health
physician

Keywords

  • International prostate symptom score
  • Lower urinary tract symptoms
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Ageing
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Lower urinary tract symptoms in male patients with stroke : A nationwide population-based study. / Chung, Jae Ho; Kim, Jung Bin; Kim, Ji Hyun.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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