Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast

Joon Seok Choi, Cheol-Koo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The free radical theory of aging emphasizes cumulative oxidative damage in the genome and intracellular proteins due to reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is a major cause for aging. Caloric restriction (CR) has been known as a representative treatment that prevents aging; however, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we show that CR extends the chronological lifespan (CLS) of budding yeast by maintaining cellular energy levels. CR reduced the generation of total ROS and mitochondrial superoxide; however, CR did not reduce the oxidative damage in proteins and DNA. Subsequently, calorie-restricted yeast had higher mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and it sustained consistent ATP levels during the process of chronological aging. Our results suggest that CR extends the survival of the chronologically aged cells by improving the efficiency of energy metabolism for the maintenance of the ATP level rather than reducing the global oxidative damage of proteins and DNA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-131
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume439
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Sep 13

Fingerprint

Caloric Restriction
Saccharomycetales
Yeast
Adenosine Triphosphate
Maintenance
Aging of materials
Reactive Oxygen Species
Proteins
Mitochondrial Membrane Potential
DNA
Superoxides
Electron energy levels
Energy Metabolism
DNA Damage
Free Radicals
Genes
Yeasts
Genome
Membranes

Keywords

  • Aging
  • ATP
  • Budding yeast
  • Caloric restriction
  • Chronological lifespan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Maintenance of cellular ATP level by caloric restriction correlates chronological survival of budding yeast. / Choi, Joon Seok; Lee, Cheol-Koo.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 439, No. 1, 13.09.2013, p. 126-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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