Mast cell activators as novel immune regulators

Brandi Johnson-Weaver, Hae Woong Choi, Soman N. Abraham, Herman F. Staats

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mast cells are an important cell type of the innate immune system that when activated, play a crucial role in generating protective innate host responses after bacterial and viral infection. Additionally, activated mast cells influence lymph node composition to regulate the induction of adaptive immune responses. The recognition that mast cells play a beneficial role in host responses to microbial infection and induction of adaptive immunity has provided the rationale to evaluate mast cell activators for use as antimicrobials or vaccine adjuvants. This review summarizes the role of mast cell activators in antimicrobial responses while also discussing the use of different classes of mast cell activators as potent vaccine adjuvants that enhance the induction of protective immune responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-95
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Pharmacology
Volume41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Aug
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

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