Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry of cuticular lipid profiles can differentiate sex, age, and mating status of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

Estrella Suarez, Hien P. Nguyen, Israel P. Ortiz, Kyu Jong Lee, Seoung Bum Kim, Jaroslaw Krzywinski, Kevin A. Schug

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Malaria is a devastating mosquito-borne disease, which affects hundreds of millions of people each year. It is transmitted predominantly by Anopheles gambiae, whose females must be >10 days old to become infective. In this study, cuticular lipids from a laboratory strain of this mosquito species were analyzed using a mass spectrometry method to evaluate their utility for age, sex and mating status differentiation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), in conjunction with an acenaphthene/silver nitrate matrix preparation, was shown to be 100% effective in classifying A. gambiae females into 1, 7-10, and 14 days of age. MALDI-MS analysis, supported by multivariate statistical methods, was also effective in detecting cuticular lipid differences between the sexes and between virgin and mated females. The technique requires further testing, but the obtained results suggest that MALDI-MS cuticular lipid spectra could be used for age grading of A. gambiae females with precision greater than with other available methods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-163
Number of pages7
JournalAnalytica Chimica Acta
Volume706
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Nov 7

Keywords

  • Anopheles gambiae
  • Cuticular hydrocarbons
  • Cuticular lipids
  • Malaria
  • Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization
  • Mosquito
  • Principal component analysis
  • Support vector machines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry of cuticular lipid profiles can differentiate sex, age, and mating status of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this