Mechanical Behavior of Hybrid Soil Nail-Anchor System

Hyungjoon Seo, In Mo Lee, Young Moo Ryu, Jee Hee Jung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Prestressed soil-nail system has two reinforcing components: steel bar and PC strands. The steel bar with relatively less elongation yields earlier than PC strands. Thus, yield displacements of these two components should be matched to maximize the design load (capacity) of prestressed soil-nail. To achieve this, PC strands need to be prestressed before applying pullout load. In this study, load transfer mechanisms of soil-nail and prestressed soil-nail were determined based on skin friction theory and load transfer theory. The load transfer was derived analytically based on the assumption that skin friction at the interface was fully mobilized. It was then compared with results from field pullout tests performed to identify in-situ load transfer mechanism. Additionally, optimum prestress level required to maximize the pullout loading capacity was evaluated and compared with those obtained from field tests.

Original languageEnglish
JournalKSCE Journal of Civil Engineering
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Nails
Anchors
Soils
Skin friction
Steel
Tribology
Elongation

Keywords

  • field pullout tests
  • load transfer
  • optimum prestress
  • prestressed soil-nail
  • skin friction theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Mechanical Behavior of Hybrid Soil Nail-Anchor System. / Seo, Hyungjoon; Lee, In Mo; Ryu, Young Moo; Jung, Jee Hee.

In: KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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