Membrane capacitive deionisation as an alternative to the 2nd pass for seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant for bromide removal

Pema Dorji, Jongmoon Choi, David Inhyuk Kim, Sherub Phuntsho, Seungkwan Hong, Ho Kyong Shon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most Australian surface and ground waters have relatively high concentration of bromide between 400 and 8000 μg/L and even higher concentration in seawater between 60,000–78,000 μg/L. Although bromide is not regulated, even at low concentrations of 50–100 μg/L, it can lead to the formation of several types of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) during the disinfection process. One of the major concerns with brominated DBPs is the formation of bromate (BrO3 ), a serious carcinogen that is formed when water containing a high concentration of bromide is disinfected. As a result, bromate is highly regulated in Australian water standards with the maximum concentration of 20 μg/L in the drinking water. Since seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination plays an important role in augmenting fresh water supplies in Australia, SWRO plants in Australia usually adopt 2nd pass brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) for effective bromide removal, which is not only energy-intensive to operate but also has higher capital cost. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of membrane capacitive deionisation (MCDI) as one of the alternatives to the 2nd pass BWRO for effective bromide removal in a more energy efficient way.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-119
Number of pages7
JournalDesalination
Volume433
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 May 1

Fingerprint

Reverse osmosis
Desalination
Bromides
bromide
Seawater
Disinfection
membrane
seawater
Membranes
Bromates
disinfection
Byproducts
Water
brackish water
Carcinogens
Surface waters
Water supply
Potable water
carcinogen
Groundwater

Keywords

  • Bromide
  • Desalination
  • Disinfection by-products
  • Membrane capacitive deionisation
  • Reverse osmosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Membrane capacitive deionisation as an alternative to the 2nd pass for seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant for bromide removal. / Dorji, Pema; Choi, Jongmoon; Kim, David Inhyuk; Phuntsho, Sherub; Hong, Seungkwan; Shon, Ho Kyong.

In: Desalination, Vol. 433, 01.05.2018, p. 113-119.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dorji, Pema ; Choi, Jongmoon ; Kim, David Inhyuk ; Phuntsho, Sherub ; Hong, Seungkwan ; Shon, Ho Kyong. / Membrane capacitive deionisation as an alternative to the 2nd pass for seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant for bromide removal. In: Desalination. 2018 ; Vol. 433. pp. 113-119.
@article{a64401fe419b4979ab9c15bee95db3fa,
title = "Membrane capacitive deionisation as an alternative to the 2nd pass for seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant for bromide removal",
abstract = "Most Australian surface and ground waters have relatively high concentration of bromide between 400 and 8000 μg/L and even higher concentration in seawater between 60,000–78,000 μg/L. Although bromide is not regulated, even at low concentrations of 50–100 μg/L, it can lead to the formation of several types of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) during the disinfection process. One of the major concerns with brominated DBPs is the formation of bromate (BrO3 −), a serious carcinogen that is formed when water containing a high concentration of bromide is disinfected. As a result, bromate is highly regulated in Australian water standards with the maximum concentration of 20 μg/L in the drinking water. Since seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination plays an important role in augmenting fresh water supplies in Australia, SWRO plants in Australia usually adopt 2nd pass brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) for effective bromide removal, which is not only energy-intensive to operate but also has higher capital cost. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of membrane capacitive deionisation (MCDI) as one of the alternatives to the 2nd pass BWRO for effective bromide removal in a more energy efficient way.",
keywords = "Bromide, Desalination, Disinfection by-products, Membrane capacitive deionisation, Reverse osmosis",
author = "Pema Dorji and Jongmoon Choi and Kim, {David Inhyuk} and Sherub Phuntsho and Seungkwan Hong and Shon, {Ho Kyong}",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.desal.2018.01.020",
language = "English",
volume = "433",
pages = "113--119",
journal = "Desalination",
issn = "0011-9164",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Membrane capacitive deionisation as an alternative to the 2nd pass for seawater reverse osmosis desalination plant for bromide removal

AU - Dorji, Pema

AU - Choi, Jongmoon

AU - Kim, David Inhyuk

AU - Phuntsho, Sherub

AU - Hong, Seungkwan

AU - Shon, Ho Kyong

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Most Australian surface and ground waters have relatively high concentration of bromide between 400 and 8000 μg/L and even higher concentration in seawater between 60,000–78,000 μg/L. Although bromide is not regulated, even at low concentrations of 50–100 μg/L, it can lead to the formation of several types of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) during the disinfection process. One of the major concerns with brominated DBPs is the formation of bromate (BrO3 −), a serious carcinogen that is formed when water containing a high concentration of bromide is disinfected. As a result, bromate is highly regulated in Australian water standards with the maximum concentration of 20 μg/L in the drinking water. Since seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination plays an important role in augmenting fresh water supplies in Australia, SWRO plants in Australia usually adopt 2nd pass brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) for effective bromide removal, which is not only energy-intensive to operate but also has higher capital cost. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of membrane capacitive deionisation (MCDI) as one of the alternatives to the 2nd pass BWRO for effective bromide removal in a more energy efficient way.

AB - Most Australian surface and ground waters have relatively high concentration of bromide between 400 and 8000 μg/L and even higher concentration in seawater between 60,000–78,000 μg/L. Although bromide is not regulated, even at low concentrations of 50–100 μg/L, it can lead to the formation of several types of harmful disinfection by-products (DBPs) during the disinfection process. One of the major concerns with brominated DBPs is the formation of bromate (BrO3 −), a serious carcinogen that is formed when water containing a high concentration of bromide is disinfected. As a result, bromate is highly regulated in Australian water standards with the maximum concentration of 20 μg/L in the drinking water. Since seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination plays an important role in augmenting fresh water supplies in Australia, SWRO plants in Australia usually adopt 2nd pass brackish water reverse osmosis (BWRO) for effective bromide removal, which is not only energy-intensive to operate but also has higher capital cost. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of membrane capacitive deionisation (MCDI) as one of the alternatives to the 2nd pass BWRO for effective bromide removal in a more energy efficient way.

KW - Bromide

KW - Desalination

KW - Disinfection by-products

KW - Membrane capacitive deionisation

KW - Reverse osmosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044256273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044256273&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.desal.2018.01.020

DO - 10.1016/j.desal.2018.01.020

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85044256273

VL - 433

SP - 113

EP - 119

JO - Desalination

JF - Desalination

SN - 0011-9164

ER -