Mesenchymal stem cells co-cultured with colorectal cancer cells showed increased invasive and proliferative abilities due to its altered p53/TGF-β1 levels

In Rok Oh, Bernardo Raymundo, Mi Jung Kim, Chan Wha Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Signaling between cancer cells, their neighboring cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) forms the tumor microenvironment. The complex heterogeneity of this microenvironment varies depending on the tumor type and its origins. However, most of the existing cancer-based studies have focused on cancer cells. In this study, we used a direct co-culture system (cross-talk signaling) to induce cross-interaction between cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells. This induced deformation of MSCs. MSCs showed a diminished ability to maintain homeostasis. In particular, increase in the invasion ability of MSCs by TGF-β1 and decrease in p53, which plays a key role in cancer development, is an important discovery. It can thus be deduced that blocking these changes can effectively inhibit metastatic colorectal cancer. In conclusion, understanding the interactions and changes in MSCs associated with cancer will help develop novel therapeutic strategies for cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-267
Number of pages12
JournalBioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry
Volume84
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Feb 1

Keywords

  • co-culture
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • p53
  • TGF-β1
  • tumor microenvironment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Organic Chemistry

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