Metal microparticle - Polymer composites as printable, bio/ecoresorbable conductive inks

Seungae Lee, Jahyun Koo, Seung Kyun Kang, Gayoung Park, Yung Jong Lee, Yu Yu Chen, Seon Ah Lim, Kyung-Mi Lee, John A. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biologically and environmentally resorbable electronic devices support application possibilities that cannot be addressed with conventional technologies. This paper presents highly conductive, water-soluble composites that can be printed to form contacts, interconnects, antennas, and other important features that are essential to nearly all systems of this type. An optimized material formulation involves . in situ polymerization to yield a polyanhydride containing a dispersion of molybdenum microparticles at appropriate concentrations. Comparisons of essential physical and electrical properties of these materials to those of composites formed with other polymers and other metal microparticles reveal the relevant considerations. Various functional demonstrations of screen-printed test structures and devices illustrate the suitability of these conductive inks for use in water-soluble electronic devices. A key advantage of the material introduced here compared to alternatives is its ability to maintain conductance over significant periods of time while immersed in relevant aqueous solutions. Studies involving live animal models establish the biocompatibility.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMaterials Today
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Jan 1

Fingerprint

inks
microparticles
Ink
Polymers
Metals
composite materials
Polyanhydrides
Composite materials
polymers
metals
animal models
Molybdenum
Water
biocompatibility
Biocompatibility
electronics
water
molybdenum
Animals
Electric properties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Lee, S., Koo, J., Kang, S. K., Park, G., Lee, Y. J., Chen, Y. Y., ... Rogers, J. A. (Accepted/In press). Metal microparticle - Polymer composites as printable, bio/ecoresorbable conductive inks. Materials Today. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mattod.2017.12.005

Metal microparticle - Polymer composites as printable, bio/ecoresorbable conductive inks. / Lee, Seungae; Koo, Jahyun; Kang, Seung Kyun; Park, Gayoung; Lee, Yung Jong; Chen, Yu Yu; Lim, Seon Ah; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Rogers, John A.

In: Materials Today, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Seungae ; Koo, Jahyun ; Kang, Seung Kyun ; Park, Gayoung ; Lee, Yung Jong ; Chen, Yu Yu ; Lim, Seon Ah ; Lee, Kyung-Mi ; Rogers, John A. / Metal microparticle - Polymer composites as printable, bio/ecoresorbable conductive inks. In: Materials Today. 2018.
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