Methodological study investigating long term laser Doppler measured cerebral blood flow changes in a permanently occluded rat stroke model

David J. Eve, James Musso, Dong-Hyuk Park, Cathy Oliveira, Kenny Pollock, Andrew Hope, Marc Olivier Baradez, John D. Sinden, Paul R. Sanberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cerebral blood flow is impaired during middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat model of stroke. However, the long term effects on cerebral blood flow following occlusion have received little attention. We examined cerebral blood flow in both sides at multiple time points following middle cerebral artery occlusion of the rat. The bilateral cerebral blood flow in young male Sprague Dawley rats was measured at the time of occlusion, as well as 4, 10 and 16 weeks after occlusion. Under the present experimental conditions, the difference between the left and right side's cerebral blood flow was observed to appear to switch in direction in a visual oscillatory fashion over time in the sham-treated group, whereas the occluded animals consistently showed left side dominance. One group of rats was intraparenchymally transplanted with a human neural stem cell line (CTX0E03 cells) known to have benefit in stroke models. Cerebral blood flow in the lesioned side of the cell-treated group was observed to be improved compared to the untreated rats and to demonstrate a similar oscillatory nature as that observed in sham-treated animals. These findings suggest that multiple bilateral monitoring of cerebral blood flow over time can show effects of stem cell transplantation efficiently as well as functional tests in an animal stroke model.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-56
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Methods
Volume180
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 May 30
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Lasers
Stroke
Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction
Neural Stem Cells
Stem Cell Transplantation
Sprague Dawley Rats
Animal Models
Cell Line

Keywords

  • Cell transplantation
  • Cerebral blood flow
  • Laser Doppler
  • Middle cerebral artery occlusion
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Methodological study investigating long term laser Doppler measured cerebral blood flow changes in a permanently occluded rat stroke model. / Eve, David J.; Musso, James; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Oliveira, Cathy; Pollock, Kenny; Hope, Andrew; Baradez, Marc Olivier; Sinden, John D.; Sanberg, Paul R.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Vol. 180, No. 1, 30.05.2009, p. 52-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eve, David J. ; Musso, James ; Park, Dong-Hyuk ; Oliveira, Cathy ; Pollock, Kenny ; Hope, Andrew ; Baradez, Marc Olivier ; Sinden, John D. ; Sanberg, Paul R. / Methodological study investigating long term laser Doppler measured cerebral blood flow changes in a permanently occluded rat stroke model. In: Journal of Neuroscience Methods. 2009 ; Vol. 180, No. 1. pp. 52-56.
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