mHealth use for non-communicable diseases care in primary health: patients' perspective from rural settings and refugee camps

Shadi Saleh, Angie Farah, Nour El Arnaout, Hani Dimassi, Christo El Morr, Carles Muntaner, Walid Ammar, Randa Hamadeh, Mohamad Alameddine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) account for 85% of deaths in Lebanon and contribute to remarkable morbidity and mortality among refugees and underserved populations. This study assesses the perspectives of individuals with hypertension and/or diabetes in rural areas and Palestinian refugee camps towards a population based mHealth intervention called 'eSahha'. Methods: The study employs a mixed-methods design to evaluate the effectiveness of SMSs on self-reported perceptions of lifestyle modifications. Quantitative data was collected through phone surveys, and qualitative data through focus group discussions. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis were performed. Results: About 93.9% (n = 1000) of respondents perceived the SMSs as useful and easy to read and understand. About 76.9% reported compliance with SMSs through daily behavioral modifications. Women (P = 0.007), people aged ≥76 years (P < 0.001), unemployed individuals (P < 0.001), individuals who only read and write (P < 0.001) or those who are illiterate (P < 0.001) were significantly more likely to receive and not read the SMSs. Behavior change across settings was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: While SMS-based interventions targeting individuals with hypertension and/or diabetes were generally satisfactory among those living in rural areas and Palestinian refugee camps in Lebanon, a more tailored approach for older, illiterate and unemployed individuals is needed. Keywords: e-health, refugees.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)ii52-ii63
JournalJournal of public health (Oxford, England)
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Dec 1

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Refugees
Telemedicine
Primary Health Care
Lebanon
Hypertension
Vulnerable Populations
Focus Groups
Life Style
Morbidity
Mortality
Health
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

mHealth use for non-communicable diseases care in primary health : patients' perspective from rural settings and refugee camps. / Saleh, Shadi; Farah, Angie; El Arnaout, Nour; Dimassi, Hani; El Morr, Christo; Muntaner, Carles; Ammar, Walid; Hamadeh, Randa; Alameddine, Mohamad.

In: Journal of public health (Oxford, England), Vol. 40, No. 2, 01.12.2018, p. ii52-ii63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saleh, S, Farah, A, El Arnaout, N, Dimassi, H, El Morr, C, Muntaner, C, Ammar, W, Hamadeh, R & Alameddine, M 2018, 'mHealth use for non-communicable diseases care in primary health: patients' perspective from rural settings and refugee camps', Journal of public health (Oxford, England), vol. 40, no. 2, pp. ii52-ii63. https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdy172
Saleh, Shadi ; Farah, Angie ; El Arnaout, Nour ; Dimassi, Hani ; El Morr, Christo ; Muntaner, Carles ; Ammar, Walid ; Hamadeh, Randa ; Alameddine, Mohamad. / mHealth use for non-communicable diseases care in primary health : patients' perspective from rural settings and refugee camps. In: Journal of public health (Oxford, England). 2018 ; Vol. 40, No. 2. pp. ii52-ii63.
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