Microfluidic chip based hematoanalyzer using polyelectrolytic gel electrodes

Kwang Bok Kim, Honggu Chun, Hee Chan Kim, Taek Dong Chung

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We reports on a novel microfluidic chip with polyelectrolytic gel electrodes (PGEs) used to rapidly count the number of red blood cells in diluted whole blood. The number and amplitude of dc impedance peaks provide the information about the number and size of red blood cells, respectively. This system features a low-voltage dc detection method and noncontact condition between cells and metal electrodes. The performance of this PGEs-based system was evaluated in three steps. First, in order to observe the size-only dependence of the impedance signal, three different sizes of fluorescent microbeads were used in the experiment. Second, the cell counting performance was evaluated by using 7.2 μm fluorescent microbeads, similar in size to red blood cells, in various concentrations and comparing the results with an animal hematoanalyzer. Finally, in human blood sample tests, intravenously collected whole blood was just diluted in a phosphate buffered saline without centrifuge or other pretreatments. The PGEs-based system produced almost identical numbers of red blood cells in over 800-fold diluted samples to the results from a commercialized human hematoanalyzer.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume7207
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
EventMicrofluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems VII - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: 2009 Jan 262009 Jan 28

Other

OtherMicrofluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems VII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose, CA
Period09/1/2609/1/28

Fingerprint

Microfluidics
erythrocytes
Electrodes
Blood
Gels
chips
gels
blood
electrodes
Erythrocytes
Electric Impedance
Microspheres
Cells
impedance
centrifuges
Erythrocyte Count
Hematologic Tests
cells
pretreatment
low voltage

Keywords

  • Hematoanalyzer
  • Microfluidic chip
  • Polyelectrolytic gel electrode
  • Red blood cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Kim, K. B., Chun, H., Kim, H. C., & Chung, T. D. (2009). Microfluidic chip based hematoanalyzer using polyelectrolytic gel electrodes. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 7207). [72070S] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.810648

Microfluidic chip based hematoanalyzer using polyelectrolytic gel electrodes. / Kim, Kwang Bok; Chun, Honggu; Kim, Hee Chan; Chung, Taek Dong.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7207 2009. 72070S.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Kim, KB, Chun, H, Kim, HC & Chung, TD 2009, Microfluidic chip based hematoanalyzer using polyelectrolytic gel electrodes. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 7207, 72070S, Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems VII, San Jose, CA, United States, 09/1/26. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.810648
Kim KB, Chun H, Kim HC, Chung TD. Microfluidic chip based hematoanalyzer using polyelectrolytic gel electrodes. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7207. 2009. 72070S https://doi.org/10.1117/12.810648
Kim, Kwang Bok ; Chun, Honggu ; Kim, Hee Chan ; Chung, Taek Dong. / Microfluidic chip based hematoanalyzer using polyelectrolytic gel electrodes. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 7207 2009.
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