Microsatellite alteration in histologically normal lung tissue of patients with non-small cell lung cancer

Jae Yong Park, Hyo Sung Jeon, Sun Ha Park, Tae In Park, Ji Woong Son, Chang Ho Kim, Jae Ho Park, In San Kim, Tae Hoon Jung, Su Han Jun

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microsatellite alteration (MSA) has been observed in a fraction of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Most prior studies regarding MSA in lung cancer have usually used adjacent non-malignant lung tissues as a source of constitutional DNA. However, these normal tissues might have genetic alterations because the entire field of bronchial tree is exposed to the same carcinogenic insult. The aim of this study was to search if MSA is present in the histologically normal lung tissue of patients with NSCLC. Tumor and corresponding normal lung tissue specimens were obtained from 20 patients with NSCLC. Normal lung tissue specimens were obtained from either the opposite end of resected surgical samples or as distant from the tumor as possible. They were examined histopathologically and confirmed as normal by H-E stain. Patients' peripheral lymphocytes were used as the source for the normal DNA. Sixteen markers on 3p and 9p (nine and seven markers, respectively) were used. MSA was detected in seven of 20 (35%) histologically normal lung tissue specimens at a frequency similar to that observed in tumor tissue (eight of 20, 40%). Five cases showed MSA in both normal lung tissue and the corresponding tumor. In these five cases, MSA in normal lung tissue was detected at the same microsatellite markers which MSA was detected in the corresponding tumor. The number and size of novel bands in normal lung tissue was identical to that in tumor tissue except in one case. In which case, the same pattern of MSA was found in both normal lung tissue and corresponding tumor tissue at two markers. However, at one marker, while one identical novel band was detected in normal lung tissue and corresponding tumor tissue, another novel band was found only in tumor tissue. In two of 12 patients whose tumor was negative for the presence of MSA, MSA was detected in normal lung tissue. These results indicate that genetic alterations are widely distributed in the lung tissue of patients with lung cancer and provide considerable support for the field cancerization theory. Screening for MSA in resected normal lung tissue might be a new method to identify patients at high risk for developing second primary lung cancers. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-89
Number of pages7
JournalLung Cancer
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Histologically normal lung tissue
  • Lung cancer
  • Microsatellite alteration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cancer Research

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  • Cite this

    Park, J. Y., Jeon, H. S., Park, S. H., Park, T. I., Son, J. W., Kim, C. H., Park, J. H., Kim, I. S., Jung, T. H., & Jun, S. H. (2000). Microsatellite alteration in histologically normal lung tissue of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Lung Cancer, 30(2), 83-89. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0169-5002(00)00189-6