Microstructural Developments and Tensile Properties of Lean Fe-Mn-Al-C Lightweight Steels

Seok S Sohn, S. Lee, B. J. Lee, J. H. Kwak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Concepts of Fe-Al-Mn-C-based lightweight steels are fairly simple, but primary metallurgical issues are complicated. In this study, recent studies on lean-composition lightweight steels were reviewed, summarized, and emphasized by their microstructural development and mechanical properties. The lightweight steels containing a low-density element of Al were designed by thermodynamic calculation and were manufactured by conventional industrial processes. Their microstructures consisted of various secondary phases as κ-carbide, martensite, and austenite in the ferrite matrix according to manufacturing and annealing procedures. The solidification microstructure containing segregations of C, Mn, and Al produced a banded structure during the hot rolling. The (ferrite + austenite) duplex microstructure was formed after the annealing, and the austenite was retained at room temperature. It was because the thermal stability of austenite nucleated from fine κ-carbide was quite high due to fine grain size of austenite. Because these lightweight steels have outstanding properties of strength and ductility as well as reduced density, they give a promise for automotive applications requiring excellent properties.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1857-1867
Number of pages11
JournalJOM
Volume66
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

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Steel
Tensile properties
Austenite
Microstructure
Ferrite
Carbides
Annealing
Hot rolling
Martensite
Ductility
Solidification
Thermodynamic stability
Thermodynamics
Mechanical properties
Chemical analysis
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Microstructural Developments and Tensile Properties of Lean Fe-Mn-Al-C Lightweight Steels. / Sohn, Seok S; Lee, S.; Lee, B. J.; Kwak, J. H.

In: JOM, Vol. 66, No. 9, 01.01.2014, p. 1857-1867.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sohn, Seok S ; Lee, S. ; Lee, B. J. ; Kwak, J. H. / Microstructural Developments and Tensile Properties of Lean Fe-Mn-Al-C Lightweight Steels. In: JOM. 2014 ; Vol. 66, No. 9. pp. 1857-1867.
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