Molecular characterization and environmental impacts of water-soluble organic compounds of bio-oil from the thermochemical treatment of domestic sewage sludge

Minghao Shen, Xiangdong Zhu, Hua Shang, Fei Feng, Yong Sik Ok, Shicheng Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Water-soluble organic compounds derived from bio-oil (WOCB) are regarded as potential risk sources of sludge thermochemical treatment. This study showed that 10.35 mg of water-soluble organic carbon and 1.32 mg of water-soluble organic nitrogen were released per gram of sludge when the final temperature of thermochemical treatment was 600 °C. WOCB was mainly formed at 300–500 °C. Furthermore, FT-ICR MS results indicated that high temperatures promoted deamination reactions, and low molecular weight (LMW) compounds with low oxygen number polymerized into aromatic compounds with increasing temperature. Noteworthily, WOCB released at 20–600 °C showed strong phytotoxicity to wheat. LMW compounds with lignin/carboxylic rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM)-like structures derived from low temperatures (200–400 °C) induced this inhibitory effect, but lipids containing nitrogen and sulfur from high temperatures (400–600 °C) can act as nutrients to promote wheat growth. This study provides theoretical support for the risk control and benefits assessments of sludge thermochemical treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Article number144050
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume756
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Feb 20

Keywords

  • Bio-oil
  • Domestic sewage sludge
  • Environmental impact
  • Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS)
  • Thermochemical treatment
  • Water-soluble organic compounds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

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