Molecular epidemiological study for tick-borne disease (Ehrlichia and Anaplasma spp.) surveillance at selected U.S. military training sites/installations in Korea

Joon Seok Chae, Chul M. Kim, Eun H. Kim, Eun Jeong Hur, Terry A. Klein, Tae K. Kang, Hee Choon Lee, Jin Won Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vector-borne diseases are a potential public health threat to U.S. Forces Korea (USFK). Ehrlichia and Anaplasma spp., transmitted by ticks, are only two of several diseases that may affect military readiness and operations. Rodents were collected at selected U.S. military installations and training sites in the Republic of Korea. DNA was extracted from spleen tissues and assayed by PCR methods for Ehrlichia and Anaplasma species. From rodents and mustelids collected during 1999 and 2000, a total of 196 Apodemus agrarius (striped field mouse), 2 Mustela sibirica (weasel), and 1 Cricetulus triton nestor (Korean greater long-tailed hamster) were assayed for Ehrlichia and Anaplasma species-specific DNA fragments. Rodent surveillance indicated a very high prevalence of Ehrlichia and Anaplasma spp. at selected training sites. Ehrlichia/Anaplasma DNA were identified from spleen tissue from 157 Apodemus agrarius, 1 Mustela sibirica, and 1 Cricetulus riton nestor. Species-specific DNA fragments of E. canis (45), E. ewingii (16), A. phagocytophila (5), and A. platys (62) were amplified by PCR techniques. Seventy-one striped field mice had single infections, while 24 had mixed infections of 2 (17 specimens), 3 (7 specimens), or 4 (1 specimen) pathogens. The striped field mouse plays a role as a reservoir for latent infections of various Ehrlichia or Anaplasma species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-125
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume990
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Jul 16

Keywords

  • Anaplasma sp.
  • Ehrlichia sp.
  • Korea
  • Military personnel
  • Rodents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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