Molecular mechanisms of appetite regulation

Ji Hee Yu, Min Seon Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of obesity has been rapidly increasing worldwide over the last several decades and has become a major health problem in developed countries. The brain, especially the hypothalamus, plays a key role in the control of food intake by sensing metabolic signals from peripheral organs and modulating feeding behaviors. To accomplish these important roles, the hypothalamus communicates with other brain areas such as the brainstem and reward-related limbic pathways. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and pancreatic β-cell-derived insulin inform adiposity to the hypothalamus. Gut hormones such as cholecysto-kinin, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, and oxyntomodulin transfer satiety signals to the brain and ghrelin relays hunger signals. The endocannabinoid system and nutrients are also involved in the physiological regulation of food intake. In this article, we briefly review physiological mechanisms of appetite regulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-398
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes and Metabolism Journal
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Appetite Regulation
Hypothalamus
Oxyntomodulin
Brain
Pancreatic Hormones
Peptide YY
Pancreatic Polypeptide
Endocannabinoids
Kinins
Ghrelin
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
Hunger
Adiposity
Feeding Behavior
Leptin
Reward
Developed Countries
Adipocytes
Brain Stem
Obesity

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Appetite
  • Hypothalamus
  • Leptin
  • Satiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Molecular mechanisms of appetite regulation. / Yu, Ji Hee; Kim, Min Seon.

In: Diabetes and Metabolism Journal, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.12.2012, p. 391-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Yu, Ji Hee ; Kim, Min Seon. / Molecular mechanisms of appetite regulation. In: Diabetes and Metabolism Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 36, No. 6. pp. 391-398.
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