Multifunctional Photonics Nanoparticles for Crossing the Blood–Brain Barrier and Effecting Optically Trackable Brain Theranostics

Ajay Singh, Woong Kim, Youngsun Kim, Keunsoo Jeong, Chi Soo Kang, Young Soo Kim, Joonseok Koh, Supriya D. Mahajan, Paras N. Prasad, Sehoon Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Theranostic photonic nanoparticles (TPNs) that cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently deliver a therapeutic agent to treat brain diseases, simultaneously providing optical tracking of drug delivery and release, are introduced. These TPNs are constructed by physical encapsulation of visible and/or near-infrared photonic molecules, in an ultrasmall micellar structure (<15 nm). Phytochemical curcumin is employed as a therapeutic as well as visible-emitting photonic component. In vitro BBB model studies and animal imaging, as well as ex vivo examination, reveal that these TPNs are capable of transmigration across the BBB and subsequent accumulation near the orthotopic xenograft of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) that is the most common and aggressive brain tumor whose vasculature retains permeability-resistant properties. The intracranial delivery and release of curcumin can be visualized by imaging fluorescence produced by energy transfer from curcumin as the donor to the near-infrared emitting dye, coloaded in TPN, where curcumin induced apoptosis of glioma cells. At an extremely low dose of TPN, a significant therapeutic outcome against GBM is demonstrated noninvasively by bioluminescence monitoring of time-lapse proliferation of luciferase-expressing U-87 MG human GBM in the brain. This approach of TPN can be generally applied to a broad range of brain diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7057-7066
Number of pages10
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume26
Issue number39
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 18
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

blood-brain barrier
Photonics
brain
Brain
photonics
Nanoparticles
nanoparticles
Curcumin
delivery
optical tracking
Bioluminescence
Infrared radiation
bioluminescence
Imaging techniques
apoptosis
Phytochemicals
Cell death
Luciferases
Drug delivery
Encapsulation

Keywords

  • blood–brain barrier
  • brain tumor therapy
  • drug delivery
  • fluorescence imaging
  • theranostic nanoparticles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Multifunctional Photonics Nanoparticles for Crossing the Blood–Brain Barrier and Effecting Optically Trackable Brain Theranostics. / Singh, Ajay; Kim, Woong; Kim, Youngsun; Jeong, Keunsoo; Kang, Chi Soo; Kim, Young Soo; Koh, Joonseok; Mahajan, Supriya D.; Prasad, Paras N.; Kim, Sehoon.

In: Advanced Functional Materials, Vol. 26, No. 39, 18.10.2016, p. 7057-7066.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singh, Ajay ; Kim, Woong ; Kim, Youngsun ; Jeong, Keunsoo ; Kang, Chi Soo ; Kim, Young Soo ; Koh, Joonseok ; Mahajan, Supriya D. ; Prasad, Paras N. ; Kim, Sehoon. / Multifunctional Photonics Nanoparticles for Crossing the Blood–Brain Barrier and Effecting Optically Trackable Brain Theranostics. In: Advanced Functional Materials. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 39. pp. 7057-7066.
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