Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles

Jaehong Key, Deepika Dhawan, Deborah W. Knapp, Kwang Meyung Kim, Ick Chan Kwon, Kuiwon Choi, James F. Leary

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Exact detection and complete removal of cancer is a key point to minimize cancer recurrence. However, it is currently very difficult to detect small tumors inside human body and continuously monitor tumors using a non-invasive imaging modality. Presently, positron emission tomography (PET) can provide the most sensitive cancer images in the human body. However, PET imaging has very limited imaging time because they typically use isotopes with short halflives. PET imaging cannot also visualize anatomical information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution images inside the body but it has a low sensitivity, so MRI contrast agents are necessary to enhance the contrast of tumor. Near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging has a good sensitivity to visualize tumor using optical probes, but it has a very limited tissue penetration depth. Therefore, we developed multi-modality nanoparticles for MRI based diagnosis and NIRF imaging based surgery of cancer. We utilized glycol chitosan of 350 nm as a vehicle for MRI contrast agents and NIRF probes. The glycol chitosan nanoparticles were conjugated with NIRF dye, Cy5.5 and bladder cancer targeting peptides to increase the internalization of cancer. For MR contrast effects, iron oxide based 22 nm nanocubes were physically loaded into the glycol chitosan nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in bladder tumor bearing mice. Our study suggests the potential of our nanoparticles by both MRI and NIRF imaging for tumor diagnosis and real-time NIRF image-guided tumor surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume8225
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Apr 2
Externally publishedYes
EventImaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues X - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: 2012 Jan 212012 Jan 23

Other

OtherImaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues X
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period12/1/2112/1/23

Fingerprint

bladder
Glycols
Chitosan
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Nanoparticles
Magnetic resonance imaging
Peptides
peptides
magnetic resonance
glycols
Tumors
tumors
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Infrared radiation
Imaging techniques
cancer
nanoparticles
Positron emission tomography
Neoplasms
positrons

Keywords

  • bladder
  • glycol chitosan
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • nanoparticle
  • near infrared fluorescence imaging
  • peptide
  • tumor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Key, J., Dhawan, D., Knapp, D. W., Kim, K. M., Kwon, I. C., Choi, K., & Leary, J. F. (2012). Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 8225). [82251F] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.908901

Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles. / Key, Jaehong; Dhawan, Deepika; Knapp, Deborah W.; Kim, Kwang Meyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Choi, Kuiwon; Leary, James F.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8225 2012. 82251F.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Key, J, Dhawan, D, Knapp, DW, Kim, KM, Kwon, IC, Choi, K & Leary, JF 2012, Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 8225, 82251F, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues X, San Francisco, CA, United States, 12/1/21. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.908901
Key J, Dhawan D, Knapp DW, Kim KM, Kwon IC, Choi K et al. Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8225. 2012. 82251F https://doi.org/10.1117/12.908901
Key, Jaehong ; Dhawan, Deepika ; Knapp, Deborah W. ; Kim, Kwang Meyung ; Kwon, Ick Chan ; Choi, Kuiwon ; Leary, James F. / Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8225 2012.
@inproceedings{9838b045b44f480eaa4ef2cb8c45222d,
title = "Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles",
abstract = "Exact detection and complete removal of cancer is a key point to minimize cancer recurrence. However, it is currently very difficult to detect small tumors inside human body and continuously monitor tumors using a non-invasive imaging modality. Presently, positron emission tomography (PET) can provide the most sensitive cancer images in the human body. However, PET imaging has very limited imaging time because they typically use isotopes with short halflives. PET imaging cannot also visualize anatomical information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution images inside the body but it has a low sensitivity, so MRI contrast agents are necessary to enhance the contrast of tumor. Near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging has a good sensitivity to visualize tumor using optical probes, but it has a very limited tissue penetration depth. Therefore, we developed multi-modality nanoparticles for MRI based diagnosis and NIRF imaging based surgery of cancer. We utilized glycol chitosan of 350 nm as a vehicle for MRI contrast agents and NIRF probes. The glycol chitosan nanoparticles were conjugated with NIRF dye, Cy5.5 and bladder cancer targeting peptides to increase the internalization of cancer. For MR contrast effects, iron oxide based 22 nm nanocubes were physically loaded into the glycol chitosan nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in bladder tumor bearing mice. Our study suggests the potential of our nanoparticles by both MRI and NIRF imaging for tumor diagnosis and real-time NIRF image-guided tumor surgery.",
keywords = "bladder, glycol chitosan, magnetic resonance imaging, nanoparticle, near infrared fluorescence imaging, peptide, tumor",
author = "Jaehong Key and Deepika Dhawan and Knapp, {Deborah W.} and Kim, {Kwang Meyung} and Kwon, {Ick Chan} and Kuiwon Choi and Leary, {James F.}",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1117/12.908901",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780819488688",
volume = "8225",
booktitle = "Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Multimodal in vivo MRI and NIRF imaging of bladder tumor using peptide conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles

AU - Key, Jaehong

AU - Dhawan, Deepika

AU - Knapp, Deborah W.

AU - Kim, Kwang Meyung

AU - Kwon, Ick Chan

AU - Choi, Kuiwon

AU - Leary, James F.

PY - 2012/4/2

Y1 - 2012/4/2

N2 - Exact detection and complete removal of cancer is a key point to minimize cancer recurrence. However, it is currently very difficult to detect small tumors inside human body and continuously monitor tumors using a non-invasive imaging modality. Presently, positron emission tomography (PET) can provide the most sensitive cancer images in the human body. However, PET imaging has very limited imaging time because they typically use isotopes with short halflives. PET imaging cannot also visualize anatomical information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution images inside the body but it has a low sensitivity, so MRI contrast agents are necessary to enhance the contrast of tumor. Near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging has a good sensitivity to visualize tumor using optical probes, but it has a very limited tissue penetration depth. Therefore, we developed multi-modality nanoparticles for MRI based diagnosis and NIRF imaging based surgery of cancer. We utilized glycol chitosan of 350 nm as a vehicle for MRI contrast agents and NIRF probes. The glycol chitosan nanoparticles were conjugated with NIRF dye, Cy5.5 and bladder cancer targeting peptides to increase the internalization of cancer. For MR contrast effects, iron oxide based 22 nm nanocubes were physically loaded into the glycol chitosan nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in bladder tumor bearing mice. Our study suggests the potential of our nanoparticles by both MRI and NIRF imaging for tumor diagnosis and real-time NIRF image-guided tumor surgery.

AB - Exact detection and complete removal of cancer is a key point to minimize cancer recurrence. However, it is currently very difficult to detect small tumors inside human body and continuously monitor tumors using a non-invasive imaging modality. Presently, positron emission tomography (PET) can provide the most sensitive cancer images in the human body. However, PET imaging has very limited imaging time because they typically use isotopes with short halflives. PET imaging cannot also visualize anatomical information. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide highresolution images inside the body but it has a low sensitivity, so MRI contrast agents are necessary to enhance the contrast of tumor. Near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) imaging has a good sensitivity to visualize tumor using optical probes, but it has a very limited tissue penetration depth. Therefore, we developed multi-modality nanoparticles for MRI based diagnosis and NIRF imaging based surgery of cancer. We utilized glycol chitosan of 350 nm as a vehicle for MRI contrast agents and NIRF probes. The glycol chitosan nanoparticles were conjugated with NIRF dye, Cy5.5 and bladder cancer targeting peptides to increase the internalization of cancer. For MR contrast effects, iron oxide based 22 nm nanocubes were physically loaded into the glycol chitosan nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized and evaluated in bladder tumor bearing mice. Our study suggests the potential of our nanoparticles by both MRI and NIRF imaging for tumor diagnosis and real-time NIRF image-guided tumor surgery.

KW - bladder

KW - glycol chitosan

KW - magnetic resonance imaging

KW - nanoparticle

KW - near infrared fluorescence imaging

KW - peptide

KW - tumor

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859042809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84859042809&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1117/12.908901

DO - 10.1117/12.908901

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84859042809

SN - 9780819488688

VL - 8225

BT - Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE

ER -