Multiple toxicity of propineb in developing zebrafish embryos: Neurotoxicity, vascular toxicity, and notochord defects in normal vertebrate development

Hahyun Park, Hyekyoung Hannah You, Gwonhwa Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A dithiocarbamate (DTC) fungicide, propineb, affects thyroid function and exerts immunotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and neurotoxicity in humans. Long-term exposure to propineb is associated with carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, malfunction of the reproductive system, and abnormalities in vital signs during organ development. However, there is no evidence of acute toxicity attributable to propineb in zebrafish. Therefore, in the present study, we assessed the toxicity of propineb in zebrafish by studying its adverse effects on embryo development, angiogenesis, and notochord development. Embryos with propineb exposure developed morphological and physiological defects and in larvae, apoptosis and notochord defects were induced in the early development stage. Transgenic fli1:eGFP zebrafish exposed to propineb showed abnormal larval development with defects in angiogenesis and deformed vasculature. Propineb induced irreversible damage to the neural development of embryos and neurogenic defects in developing zebrafish in transgenic olig2:dsRED zebrafish. These results show that exposure to propineb triggers abnormalities in different organ systems of zebrafish and suggests the physiological complexity of the response to propineb.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108993
JournalComparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part - C: Toxicology and Pharmacology
Volume243
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 May

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Embryo development
  • Notochord development
  • Propineb
  • Zebrafish model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Toxicology
  • Cell Biology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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