Nanowire photonics and their applications

Sun Kyung Kim, Thomas J. Kempa, Charles M. Lieber, Hong Kyu Park

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanostructures have enabled numerous novel and multifunctional devices with impact in many areas of science and technology [1–33]. Precise synthetic control of nanomaterial parameters, including chemical composition, size, and morphology, is key to eliciting unique device properties and thus applications [1–11,25–33]. Semiconductor nanowires are particularly attractive building blocks for integrated nanosystems because they can function as both device elements and interconnects [1–11,29,33]. This concept has been demonstrated in nanoelectronics with the assembly of devices such as field-effect transistors and integrated nanowire logic gates [8–11] and in nanophotonics with the assembly of individual light-emitting diodes and laser diodes [4–7,29,33].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationComputational Nanophotonics
Subtitle of host publicationModeling and Applications
PublisherCRC Press
Pages65-102
Number of pages38
ISBN (Electronic)9781466558786
ISBN (Print)9781466558762
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Photonics
Nanowires
nanowires
photonics
Nanosystems
Nanophotonics
Nanoelectronics
Logic gates
Field effect transistors
Nanostructured materials
Light emitting diodes
Semiconductor lasers
Nanostructures
assembly
Semiconductor materials
Chemical analysis
logic
chemical composition
light emitting diodes
field effect transistors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Kim, S. K., Kempa, T. J., Lieber, C. M., & Park, H. K. (2013). Nanowire photonics and their applications. In Computational Nanophotonics: Modeling and Applications (pp. 65-102). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b15272

Nanowire photonics and their applications. / Kim, Sun Kyung; Kempa, Thomas J.; Lieber, Charles M.; Park, Hong Kyu.

Computational Nanophotonics: Modeling and Applications. CRC Press, 2013. p. 65-102.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kim, SK, Kempa, TJ, Lieber, CM & Park, HK 2013, Nanowire photonics and their applications. in Computational Nanophotonics: Modeling and Applications. CRC Press, pp. 65-102. https://doi.org/10.1201/b15272
Kim SK, Kempa TJ, Lieber CM, Park HK. Nanowire photonics and their applications. In Computational Nanophotonics: Modeling and Applications. CRC Press. 2013. p. 65-102 https://doi.org/10.1201/b15272
Kim, Sun Kyung ; Kempa, Thomas J. ; Lieber, Charles M. ; Park, Hong Kyu. / Nanowire photonics and their applications. Computational Nanophotonics: Modeling and Applications. CRC Press, 2013. pp. 65-102
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