Need for Lumbar Puncture in Children Younger Than 12 Months Presenting With Simple Febrile Seizure

Yu Yun Son, Gun Ha Kim, Jung Hye Byeon, So-Hee Eun, Baik-Lin Eun

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Recently, conflicting results have been reported regarding the necessity of routine lumbar puncture in children less than 12 months of age with simple febrile seizure. The aims of this study were to evaluate the results of lumbar puncture in children younger than 60 months of age with febrile seizure and to reassess the need for lumbar puncture in children younger than 12 months with simple febrile seizure. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed in patients younger than 60 months who presented with febrile seizure and underwent lumbar puncture from January 2005 to January 2015. RESULTS: A total of 1249 patients presenting with febrile seizure were admitted. Of these, 816 met inclusion criteria for presenting with simple febrile seizure. Lumbar puncture was performed in 75 patients (9.2%; age, mean ± SD, 12.05 ± 9.13 months; male/female, 31/44), who were reviewed. Sixty-six (88.0%) of 75 patients were younger than 12 months. Five patients (6.7%) showed pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid, and 4 of them were younger than 1 year of age. Three patients (4.0%) had bacterial meningitis and were 4, 8, and 12 months. Streptococcus pneumoniae (2 patients) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1 patient) were isolated in cerebrospinal fluid. Nobody had neurologic signs suggesting bacterial meningitis, and all of them completed scheduled immunizations and were up-to-date. CONCLUSION: Lumbar puncture should be considered in every child younger than 12 months of age with a simple febrile seizure owing to lack of abnormal neurologic sign even if immunization is up-to-date.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPediatric Emergency Care
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016 Jul 12

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Febrile Seizures
Spinal Puncture
Bacterial Meningitides
Neurologic Manifestations
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Immunization
Leukocytosis
Klebsiella pneumoniae
Streptococcus pneumoniae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Need for Lumbar Puncture in Children Younger Than 12 Months Presenting With Simple Febrile Seizure",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Recently, conflicting results have been reported regarding the necessity of routine lumbar puncture in children less than 12 months of age with simple febrile seizure. The aims of this study were to evaluate the results of lumbar puncture in children younger than 60 months of age with febrile seizure and to reassess the need for lumbar puncture in children younger than 12 months with simple febrile seizure. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed in patients younger than 60 months who presented with febrile seizure and underwent lumbar puncture from January 2005 to January 2015. RESULTS: A total of 1249 patients presenting with febrile seizure were admitted. Of these, 816 met inclusion criteria for presenting with simple febrile seizure. Lumbar puncture was performed in 75 patients (9.2{\%}; age, mean ± SD, 12.05 ± 9.13 months; male/female, 31/44), who were reviewed. Sixty-six (88.0{\%}) of 75 patients were younger than 12 months. Five patients (6.7{\%}) showed pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid, and 4 of them were younger than 1 year of age. Three patients (4.0{\%}) had bacterial meningitis and were 4, 8, and 12 months. Streptococcus pneumoniae (2 patients) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1 patient) were isolated in cerebrospinal fluid. Nobody had neurologic signs suggesting bacterial meningitis, and all of them completed scheduled immunizations and were up-to-date. CONCLUSION: Lumbar puncture should be considered in every child younger than 12 months of age with a simple febrile seizure owing to lack of abnormal neurologic sign even if immunization is up-to-date.",
author = "Son, {Yu Yun} and Kim, {Gun Ha} and Byeon, {Jung Hye} and So-Hee Eun and Baik-Lin Eun",
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T1 - Need for Lumbar Puncture in Children Younger Than 12 Months Presenting With Simple Febrile Seizure

AU - Son, Yu Yun

AU - Kim, Gun Ha

AU - Byeon, Jung Hye

AU - Eun, So-Hee

AU - Eun, Baik-Lin

PY - 2016/7/12

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: Recently, conflicting results have been reported regarding the necessity of routine lumbar puncture in children less than 12 months of age with simple febrile seizure. The aims of this study were to evaluate the results of lumbar puncture in children younger than 60 months of age with febrile seizure and to reassess the need for lumbar puncture in children younger than 12 months with simple febrile seizure. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed in patients younger than 60 months who presented with febrile seizure and underwent lumbar puncture from January 2005 to January 2015. RESULTS: A total of 1249 patients presenting with febrile seizure were admitted. Of these, 816 met inclusion criteria for presenting with simple febrile seizure. Lumbar puncture was performed in 75 patients (9.2%; age, mean ± SD, 12.05 ± 9.13 months; male/female, 31/44), who were reviewed. Sixty-six (88.0%) of 75 patients were younger than 12 months. Five patients (6.7%) showed pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid, and 4 of them were younger than 1 year of age. Three patients (4.0%) had bacterial meningitis and were 4, 8, and 12 months. Streptococcus pneumoniae (2 patients) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1 patient) were isolated in cerebrospinal fluid. Nobody had neurologic signs suggesting bacterial meningitis, and all of them completed scheduled immunizations and were up-to-date. CONCLUSION: Lumbar puncture should be considered in every child younger than 12 months of age with a simple febrile seizure owing to lack of abnormal neurologic sign even if immunization is up-to-date.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Recently, conflicting results have been reported regarding the necessity of routine lumbar puncture in children less than 12 months of age with simple febrile seizure. The aims of this study were to evaluate the results of lumbar puncture in children younger than 60 months of age with febrile seizure and to reassess the need for lumbar puncture in children younger than 12 months with simple febrile seizure. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed in patients younger than 60 months who presented with febrile seizure and underwent lumbar puncture from January 2005 to January 2015. RESULTS: A total of 1249 patients presenting with febrile seizure were admitted. Of these, 816 met inclusion criteria for presenting with simple febrile seizure. Lumbar puncture was performed in 75 patients (9.2%; age, mean ± SD, 12.05 ± 9.13 months; male/female, 31/44), who were reviewed. Sixty-six (88.0%) of 75 patients were younger than 12 months. Five patients (6.7%) showed pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid, and 4 of them were younger than 1 year of age. Three patients (4.0%) had bacterial meningitis and were 4, 8, and 12 months. Streptococcus pneumoniae (2 patients) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1 patient) were isolated in cerebrospinal fluid. Nobody had neurologic signs suggesting bacterial meningitis, and all of them completed scheduled immunizations and were up-to-date. CONCLUSION: Lumbar puncture should be considered in every child younger than 12 months of age with a simple febrile seizure owing to lack of abnormal neurologic sign even if immunization is up-to-date.

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