Needs assessment of a core curriculum for residency training

Hyo Jin Kwon, Young-Mee Lee, Hyung Joo Chang, Ae Ri Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: The core curriculum in graduate medical education (GME) is an educational program that covers the minimum body of knowledge and skills that is required of all residents, regardless of their specialty. This study examined the opinions of stakeholders in GME regarding the core curriculum.

METHODS: A questionnaire was administered at three tertiary hospitals that were affiliated with one university; 192 residents and 61 faculty members and attending physicians participated in the survey. The questionnaire comprised six items on physician competency and the needs for a core curriculum. Questions on subjects or topics and adequate training years for each topics were asked only to residents.

RESULTS: Most residents (78.6%) and faculty members (86.9%) chose "medical expertise" as the "doctor's role in the 21st century." In contrast, communicator, manager, and collaborator were recognized by less than 30% of all participants. Most residents (74.1%) responded that a core curriculum is "necessary but not feasible," whereas 68.3% of faculty members answered that it is "absolutely needed." Regarding subjects that should be included in the core curriculum, residents and faculty members had disparate preferences- residents preferred more "management of a private clinic" and "financial management," whereas faculty members desired "medical ethics" and "communication skills."

CONCLUSION: Residents and faculty members agree that residents should develop a wide range of competencies in their training. However, the perception of the feasibility and opinions on the contents of the core curriculum differed between groups. Further studies with larger samples should be conducted to define the roles and professional competencies of physicians and the needs for a core curriculum in GME.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-212
Number of pages12
JournalKorean journal of medical education
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Sep 1

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Needs Assessment
Internship and Residency
Curriculum
Graduate Medical Education
Physicians
Professional Role
Medical Ethics
Financial Management
Tertiary Care Centers
Communication
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Education
  • Internship and residency
  • Medical graduate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Needs assessment of a core curriculum for residency training. / Kwon, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young-Mee; Chang, Hyung Joo; Kim, Ae Ri.

In: Korean journal of medical education, Vol. 27, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 201-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kwon, Hyo Jin ; Lee, Young-Mee ; Chang, Hyung Joo ; Kim, Ae Ri. / Needs assessment of a core curriculum for residency training. In: Korean journal of medical education. 2015 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 201-212.
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