Neovascular potential of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) from diabetic patients

Ja Hea Gu, Jae Sun Lee, Deok-Woo Kim, Eul Sik Yoon, Eun-Sang Dhong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We explored the vascular biology of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) from diabetic patients and applied these cells to a murine ischemic flap model to assess the comparative angiogenic potentials between normal and diabetic human ASCs. ASCs were obtained from diabetic patients (n=5) and controls (n=5). Secretion and expression of angiogenic cytokines were measured under normoxic and hypoxic condition in vitro. Conditioned media harvested from ASC cultures were assessed for their ability to stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and tubulization. The control and diabetic ASCs were injected into the murine ischemic flaps, and the surviving area was measured. Diabetic adipose-derived stromal cells showed a lower level of vascular endothelial growth factor expression and cell proliferation rates than the control cells (p<0.05). However, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor secretion, tubulogenesis, and cell proliferation in diabetic conditioned media were increased in response to hypoxic stimuli (p<0.05), and it was similar to those of control cells. In an animal study, diabetic and normal ASCs significantly increased flap survival (p<0.05); however, the functional difference was not found between the two groups. Diabetic ASCs were impaired in their ability to produce vascular endothelial growth factors and to induce cellular proliferation under hypoxic conditions. However, diabetic ASCs showed similar flap salvaging effect compared with controls. These findings may be important in the context of future study of autologous cell-based therapy in diabetic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-252
Number of pages10
JournalWound Repair and Regeneration
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Stromal Cells
Cell Proliferation
Conditioned Culture Medium
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors
Hepatocyte Growth Factor
Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Blood Vessels
Cell Culture Techniques
Cytokines
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Dermatology

Cite this

Neovascular potential of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) from diabetic patients. / Gu, Ja Hea; Lee, Jae Sun; Kim, Deok-Woo; Yoon, Eul Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang.

In: Wound Repair and Regeneration, Vol. 20, No. 2, 01.03.2012, p. 243-252.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4b4054381c144072b8f000c296ac4467,
title = "Neovascular potential of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) from diabetic patients",
abstract = "We explored the vascular biology of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) from diabetic patients and applied these cells to a murine ischemic flap model to assess the comparative angiogenic potentials between normal and diabetic human ASCs. ASCs were obtained from diabetic patients (n=5) and controls (n=5). Secretion and expression of angiogenic cytokines were measured under normoxic and hypoxic condition in vitro. Conditioned media harvested from ASC cultures were assessed for their ability to stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and tubulization. The control and diabetic ASCs were injected into the murine ischemic flaps, and the surviving area was measured. Diabetic adipose-derived stromal cells showed a lower level of vascular endothelial growth factor expression and cell proliferation rates than the control cells (p<0.05). However, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor secretion, tubulogenesis, and cell proliferation in diabetic conditioned media were increased in response to hypoxic stimuli (p<0.05), and it was similar to those of control cells. In an animal study, diabetic and normal ASCs significantly increased flap survival (p<0.05); however, the functional difference was not found between the two groups. Diabetic ASCs were impaired in their ability to produce vascular endothelial growth factors and to induce cellular proliferation under hypoxic conditions. However, diabetic ASCs showed similar flap salvaging effect compared with controls. These findings may be important in the context of future study of autologous cell-based therapy in diabetic patients.",
author = "Gu, {Ja Hea} and Lee, {Jae Sun} and Deok-Woo Kim and Yoon, {Eul Sik} and Eun-Sang Dhong",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1524-475X.2012.00765.x",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "243--252",
journal = "Wound Repair and Regeneration",
issn = "1067-1927",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neovascular potential of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) from diabetic patients

AU - Gu, Ja Hea

AU - Lee, Jae Sun

AU - Kim, Deok-Woo

AU - Yoon, Eul Sik

AU - Dhong, Eun-Sang

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - We explored the vascular biology of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) from diabetic patients and applied these cells to a murine ischemic flap model to assess the comparative angiogenic potentials between normal and diabetic human ASCs. ASCs were obtained from diabetic patients (n=5) and controls (n=5). Secretion and expression of angiogenic cytokines were measured under normoxic and hypoxic condition in vitro. Conditioned media harvested from ASC cultures were assessed for their ability to stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and tubulization. The control and diabetic ASCs were injected into the murine ischemic flaps, and the surviving area was measured. Diabetic adipose-derived stromal cells showed a lower level of vascular endothelial growth factor expression and cell proliferation rates than the control cells (p<0.05). However, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor secretion, tubulogenesis, and cell proliferation in diabetic conditioned media were increased in response to hypoxic stimuli (p<0.05), and it was similar to those of control cells. In an animal study, diabetic and normal ASCs significantly increased flap survival (p<0.05); however, the functional difference was not found between the two groups. Diabetic ASCs were impaired in their ability to produce vascular endothelial growth factors and to induce cellular proliferation under hypoxic conditions. However, diabetic ASCs showed similar flap salvaging effect compared with controls. These findings may be important in the context of future study of autologous cell-based therapy in diabetic patients.

AB - We explored the vascular biology of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) from diabetic patients and applied these cells to a murine ischemic flap model to assess the comparative angiogenic potentials between normal and diabetic human ASCs. ASCs were obtained from diabetic patients (n=5) and controls (n=5). Secretion and expression of angiogenic cytokines were measured under normoxic and hypoxic condition in vitro. Conditioned media harvested from ASC cultures were assessed for their ability to stimulate human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation and tubulization. The control and diabetic ASCs were injected into the murine ischemic flaps, and the surviving area was measured. Diabetic adipose-derived stromal cells showed a lower level of vascular endothelial growth factor expression and cell proliferation rates than the control cells (p<0.05). However, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor secretion, tubulogenesis, and cell proliferation in diabetic conditioned media were increased in response to hypoxic stimuli (p<0.05), and it was similar to those of control cells. In an animal study, diabetic and normal ASCs significantly increased flap survival (p<0.05); however, the functional difference was not found between the two groups. Diabetic ASCs were impaired in their ability to produce vascular endothelial growth factors and to induce cellular proliferation under hypoxic conditions. However, diabetic ASCs showed similar flap salvaging effect compared with controls. These findings may be important in the context of future study of autologous cell-based therapy in diabetic patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84863239105&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84863239105&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1524-475X.2012.00765.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1524-475X.2012.00765.x

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 243

EP - 252

JO - Wound Repair and Regeneration

JF - Wound Repair and Regeneration

SN - 1067-1927

IS - 2

ER -