Network Properties in Transitions of Consciousness during Propofol-induced Sedation

Minji Lee, Robert D. Sanders, Seul Ki Yeom, Dong Ok Won, Kwang Suk Seo, Hyun Jeong Kim, Giulio Tononi, Seong Whan Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reliable electroencephalography (EEG) signatures of transitions between consciousness and unconsciousness under anaesthesia have not yet been identified. Herein we examined network changes using graph theoretical analysis of high-density EEG during patient-titrated propofol-induced sedation. Responsiveness was used as a surrogate for consciousness. We divided the data into five states: baseline, transition into unresponsiveness, unresponsiveness, transition into responsiveness, and recovery. Power spectral analysis showed that delta power increased from responsiveness to unresponsiveness. In unresponsiveness, delta waves propagated from frontal to parietal regions as a traveling wave. Local increases in delta connectivity were evident in parietal but not frontal regions. Graph theory analysis showed that increased local efficiency could differentiate the levels of responsiveness. Interestingly, during transitions of responsive states, increased beta connectivity was noted relative to consciousness and unconsciousness, again with increased local efficiency. Abrupt network changes are evident in the transitions in responsiveness, with increased beta band power/connectivity marking transitions between responsive states, while the delta power/connectivity changes were consistent with the fading of consciousness using its surrogate responsiveness. These results provide novel insights into the neural correlates of these behavioural transitions and EEG signatures for monitoring the levels of consciousness under sedation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number16791
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Dec 1

Fingerprint

Propofol
Consciousness
Electroencephalography
Unconsciousness
Parietal Lobe
Anesthesia
Power (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Network Properties in Transitions of Consciousness during Propofol-induced Sedation. / Lee, Minji; Sanders, Robert D.; Yeom, Seul Ki; Won, Dong Ok; Seo, Kwang Suk; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Tononi, Giulio; Lee, Seong Whan.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 16791, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, M, Sanders, RD, Yeom, SK, Won, DO, Seo, KS, Kim, HJ, Tononi, G & Lee, SW 2017, 'Network Properties in Transitions of Consciousness during Propofol-induced Sedation', Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, 16791. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-15082-5
Lee, Minji ; Sanders, Robert D. ; Yeom, Seul Ki ; Won, Dong Ok ; Seo, Kwang Suk ; Kim, Hyun Jeong ; Tononi, Giulio ; Lee, Seong Whan. / Network Properties in Transitions of Consciousness during Propofol-induced Sedation. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
@article{3a4ef408a54f494fa440b1fdbc14a747,
title = "Network Properties in Transitions of Consciousness during Propofol-induced Sedation",
abstract = "Reliable electroencephalography (EEG) signatures of transitions between consciousness and unconsciousness under anaesthesia have not yet been identified. Herein we examined network changes using graph theoretical analysis of high-density EEG during patient-titrated propofol-induced sedation. Responsiveness was used as a surrogate for consciousness. We divided the data into five states: baseline, transition into unresponsiveness, unresponsiveness, transition into responsiveness, and recovery. Power spectral analysis showed that delta power increased from responsiveness to unresponsiveness. In unresponsiveness, delta waves propagated from frontal to parietal regions as a traveling wave. Local increases in delta connectivity were evident in parietal but not frontal regions. Graph theory analysis showed that increased local efficiency could differentiate the levels of responsiveness. Interestingly, during transitions of responsive states, increased beta connectivity was noted relative to consciousness and unconsciousness, again with increased local efficiency. Abrupt network changes are evident in the transitions in responsiveness, with increased beta band power/connectivity marking transitions between responsive states, while the delta power/connectivity changes were consistent with the fading of consciousness using its surrogate responsiveness. These results provide novel insights into the neural correlates of these behavioural transitions and EEG signatures for monitoring the levels of consciousness under sedation.",
author = "Minji Lee and Sanders, {Robert D.} and Yeom, {Seul Ki} and Won, {Dong Ok} and Seo, {Kwang Suk} and Kim, {Hyun Jeong} and Giulio Tononi and Lee, {Seong Whan}",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-017-15082-5",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Network Properties in Transitions of Consciousness during Propofol-induced Sedation

AU - Lee, Minji

AU - Sanders, Robert D.

AU - Yeom, Seul Ki

AU - Won, Dong Ok

AU - Seo, Kwang Suk

AU - Kim, Hyun Jeong

AU - Tononi, Giulio

AU - Lee, Seong Whan

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Reliable electroencephalography (EEG) signatures of transitions between consciousness and unconsciousness under anaesthesia have not yet been identified. Herein we examined network changes using graph theoretical analysis of high-density EEG during patient-titrated propofol-induced sedation. Responsiveness was used as a surrogate for consciousness. We divided the data into five states: baseline, transition into unresponsiveness, unresponsiveness, transition into responsiveness, and recovery. Power spectral analysis showed that delta power increased from responsiveness to unresponsiveness. In unresponsiveness, delta waves propagated from frontal to parietal regions as a traveling wave. Local increases in delta connectivity were evident in parietal but not frontal regions. Graph theory analysis showed that increased local efficiency could differentiate the levels of responsiveness. Interestingly, during transitions of responsive states, increased beta connectivity was noted relative to consciousness and unconsciousness, again with increased local efficiency. Abrupt network changes are evident in the transitions in responsiveness, with increased beta band power/connectivity marking transitions between responsive states, while the delta power/connectivity changes were consistent with the fading of consciousness using its surrogate responsiveness. These results provide novel insights into the neural correlates of these behavioural transitions and EEG signatures for monitoring the levels of consciousness under sedation.

AB - Reliable electroencephalography (EEG) signatures of transitions between consciousness and unconsciousness under anaesthesia have not yet been identified. Herein we examined network changes using graph theoretical analysis of high-density EEG during patient-titrated propofol-induced sedation. Responsiveness was used as a surrogate for consciousness. We divided the data into five states: baseline, transition into unresponsiveness, unresponsiveness, transition into responsiveness, and recovery. Power spectral analysis showed that delta power increased from responsiveness to unresponsiveness. In unresponsiveness, delta waves propagated from frontal to parietal regions as a traveling wave. Local increases in delta connectivity were evident in parietal but not frontal regions. Graph theory analysis showed that increased local efficiency could differentiate the levels of responsiveness. Interestingly, during transitions of responsive states, increased beta connectivity was noted relative to consciousness and unconsciousness, again with increased local efficiency. Abrupt network changes are evident in the transitions in responsiveness, with increased beta band power/connectivity marking transitions between responsive states, while the delta power/connectivity changes were consistent with the fading of consciousness using its surrogate responsiveness. These results provide novel insights into the neural correlates of these behavioural transitions and EEG signatures for monitoring the levels of consciousness under sedation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85036554354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85036554354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-017-15082-5

DO - 10.1038/s41598-017-15082-5

M3 - Article

VL - 7

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

M1 - 16791

ER -