Non-HDL cholesterol is an independent risk factor for aspirin resistance in obese patients with type 2 diabetes

Jong Dai Kim, Cheol Young Park, Kue Jeong Ahn, Jae Hyoung Cho, Kyung Mook Choi, Jun Goo Kang, Jae Hyeon Kim, Ki Young Lee, Byung Wan Lee, Ji Oh Mok, Min Kyong Moon, Joong Yeol Park, Sung Woo Park

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: We evaluated the prevalence of aspirin resistance and predictive factors for aspirin resistance in Korean type 2 diabetes patients. Approach and results: A total of 1045 type 2 diabetes patients from 11 hospitals who were taking aspirin (100mg/day for ≥2 weeks) and no other antiplatelet agents were studied to evaluate aspirin resistance. Aspirin resistance was measured in aspirin reaction units using VerifyNow®. Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥550 aspirin reaction units.Aspirin resistance was detected in 102 of the 1045 subjects (prevalence 9.8%). Aspirin resistance was associated with total cholesterol (P=0.013), LDL-cholesterol (P=0.028), and non-HDL cholesterol (P=0.008) concentrations in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only non-HDL cholesterol was associated with aspirin resistance in obese (BMI >25kg/m2) type 2 diabetes patients (adjusted odds ratio 3.55, 95% CI: 1.25-10.05, P=0.017). Conclusions: The prevalence of aspirin resistance in Korean type 2 diabetes patients is 9.8%. Non-HDL cholesterol is an independent risk factor for aspirin resistance, especially in obese type 2 diabetes patients.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)146-151
    Number of pages6
    JournalAtherosclerosis
    Volume234
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014 May

    Keywords

    • Aspirin resistance
    • Atherogenic dyslipidemia
    • Diabetes
    • Non-HDL cholesterol

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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