Nurses' inclination to report work-related injuries

organizational, work-group, and individual factors associated with reporting.

Jeanne Geiger Brown, Alison Trinkoff, Kenneth Rempher, Kathleen McPhaul, Barbara Brady, Jane Lipscomb, Carles Muntaner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Work-related injuries such as back strain are common among health care workers. Work-related injury data are a primary data source with which managers can assess workplace safety, yet many work-related injuries go unreported. This study examined organizational, work-group, and individual factors, and nurses' inclination to report a work-related injury. Using a cross-sectional mailed survey, a probability sample of currently employed nurses (N = 1,163) indicated their inclination to report a workplace injury. Inclination to report injuries was higher in organizations with onsite health programs and when health and safety committees included non-management nurses and occupational health representatives. Reporting was reduced when nurses felt a lack of concern for staff welfare from supervisors and a climate of blame for worker injuries were present. Nurses were also less inclined to report work-related injuries when working in jobs with non-standard work arrangements. Improvements in the reporting climate may influence the completeness and, thus, the value of injury data for identifying hazards in the workplace. These data could provide valuable information for targeting preventive initiatives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-217
Number of pages5
JournalAAOHN journal : official journal of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses
Volume53
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2005 May 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nurses
Wounds and Injuries
Workplace
Climate
Safety
Sampling Studies
Information Storage and Retrieval
Health
Occupational Health
Cross-Sectional Studies
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Nurses' inclination to report work-related injuries : organizational, work-group, and individual factors associated with reporting. / Brown, Jeanne Geiger; Trinkoff, Alison; Rempher, Kenneth; McPhaul, Kathleen; Brady, Barbara; Lipscomb, Jane; Muntaner, Carles.

In: AAOHN journal : official journal of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Vol. 53, No. 5, 01.05.2005, p. 213-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Jeanne Geiger ; Trinkoff, Alison ; Rempher, Kenneth ; McPhaul, Kathleen ; Brady, Barbara ; Lipscomb, Jane ; Muntaner, Carles. / Nurses' inclination to report work-related injuries : organizational, work-group, and individual factors associated with reporting. In: AAOHN journal : official journal of the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses. 2005 ; Vol. 53, No. 5. pp. 213-217.
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