Obesity and cardiovascular disease: friend or foe?

Seong Hwan Kim, Jean Pierre Després, Kwang Kon Koh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is currently one of the greatest public health issues worldwide. However, despite its known deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system and its association with numerous cardiovascular diseases (CVD), recent findings leading to the development of concepts such as metabolically healthy obesity, the obesity paradox, and protective subcutaneous fat depots have raised a lively debate on the disparate effects of obesity on health outcomes. Regarding the concept of metabolically healthy obesity, by presumably labelling a subset of obese people as metabolically healthy, physicians may not feel pressed to curb the current obesity epidemic and prevent the next generation of people from becoming obese. Another issue is that the most commonly used anthropometric index to define obesity, the body mass index, is at the core of the controversy because of its limitations including its inability to discriminate between fat mass and muscle mass. Many recent epidemiological and metabolic studies have used other indices such as waist-hip ratio, waist circumference, and imaging (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) measurements of visceral adiposity and of ectopic fat depots. In addition, emerging evidence supports the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness, skeletal muscle mass and strength in patients with obesity as useful variables to predict CVD risk beyond adiposity. In this review, we will discuss the complex and disparate effects of obesity on CVD, particularly focusing on whether, under given circumstances, it could be harmful, potentially harmless or neutral, or even possibly protective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3560-3568
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Heart Journal
Volume37
Issue number48
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Dec 21
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Adiposity
Fats
Waist-Hip Ratio
Subcutaneous Fat
Muscle Strength
Waist Circumference
Cardiovascular System
Epidemiologic Studies
Skeletal Muscle
Body Mass Index
Public Health
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Physicians
Muscles
Health
Metabolically Benign Obesity

Keywords

  • Cardiometabolic syndrome
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Metabolically healthy obesity
  • Obesity
  • Obesity paradox

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Obesity and cardiovascular disease : friend or foe? / Kim, Seong Hwan; Després, Jean Pierre; Koh, Kwang Kon.

In: European Heart Journal, Vol. 37, No. 48, 21.12.2016, p. 3560-3568.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kim, Seong Hwan ; Després, Jean Pierre ; Koh, Kwang Kon. / Obesity and cardiovascular disease : friend or foe?. In: European Heart Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 48. pp. 3560-3568.
@article{d0f03b449e2b44a58f39c78a82194752,
title = "Obesity and cardiovascular disease: friend or foe?",
abstract = "Obesity is currently one of the greatest public health issues worldwide. However, despite its known deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system and its association with numerous cardiovascular diseases (CVD), recent findings leading to the development of concepts such as metabolically healthy obesity, the obesity paradox, and protective subcutaneous fat depots have raised a lively debate on the disparate effects of obesity on health outcomes. Regarding the concept of metabolically healthy obesity, by presumably labelling a subset of obese people as metabolically healthy, physicians may not feel pressed to curb the current obesity epidemic and prevent the next generation of people from becoming obese. Another issue is that the most commonly used anthropometric index to define obesity, the body mass index, is at the core of the controversy because of its limitations including its inability to discriminate between fat mass and muscle mass. Many recent epidemiological and metabolic studies have used other indices such as waist-hip ratio, waist circumference, and imaging (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) measurements of visceral adiposity and of ectopic fat depots. In addition, emerging evidence supports the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness, skeletal muscle mass and strength in patients with obesity as useful variables to predict CVD risk beyond adiposity. In this review, we will discuss the complex and disparate effects of obesity on CVD, particularly focusing on whether, under given circumstances, it could be harmful, potentially harmless or neutral, or even possibly protective.",
keywords = "Cardiometabolic syndrome, Cardiovascular disease, Metabolically healthy obesity, Obesity, Obesity paradox",
author = "Kim, {Seong Hwan} and Despr{\'e}s, {Jean Pierre} and Koh, {Kwang Kon}",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1093/eurheartj/ehv509",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "3560--3568",
journal = "European Heart Journal",
issn = "0195-668X",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "48",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obesity and cardiovascular disease

T2 - friend or foe?

AU - Kim, Seong Hwan

AU - Després, Jean Pierre

AU - Koh, Kwang Kon

PY - 2016/12/21

Y1 - 2016/12/21

N2 - Obesity is currently one of the greatest public health issues worldwide. However, despite its known deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system and its association with numerous cardiovascular diseases (CVD), recent findings leading to the development of concepts such as metabolically healthy obesity, the obesity paradox, and protective subcutaneous fat depots have raised a lively debate on the disparate effects of obesity on health outcomes. Regarding the concept of metabolically healthy obesity, by presumably labelling a subset of obese people as metabolically healthy, physicians may not feel pressed to curb the current obesity epidemic and prevent the next generation of people from becoming obese. Another issue is that the most commonly used anthropometric index to define obesity, the body mass index, is at the core of the controversy because of its limitations including its inability to discriminate between fat mass and muscle mass. Many recent epidemiological and metabolic studies have used other indices such as waist-hip ratio, waist circumference, and imaging (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) measurements of visceral adiposity and of ectopic fat depots. In addition, emerging evidence supports the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness, skeletal muscle mass and strength in patients with obesity as useful variables to predict CVD risk beyond adiposity. In this review, we will discuss the complex and disparate effects of obesity on CVD, particularly focusing on whether, under given circumstances, it could be harmful, potentially harmless or neutral, or even possibly protective.

AB - Obesity is currently one of the greatest public health issues worldwide. However, despite its known deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system and its association with numerous cardiovascular diseases (CVD), recent findings leading to the development of concepts such as metabolically healthy obesity, the obesity paradox, and protective subcutaneous fat depots have raised a lively debate on the disparate effects of obesity on health outcomes. Regarding the concept of metabolically healthy obesity, by presumably labelling a subset of obese people as metabolically healthy, physicians may not feel pressed to curb the current obesity epidemic and prevent the next generation of people from becoming obese. Another issue is that the most commonly used anthropometric index to define obesity, the body mass index, is at the core of the controversy because of its limitations including its inability to discriminate between fat mass and muscle mass. Many recent epidemiological and metabolic studies have used other indices such as waist-hip ratio, waist circumference, and imaging (computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging) measurements of visceral adiposity and of ectopic fat depots. In addition, emerging evidence supports the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness, skeletal muscle mass and strength in patients with obesity as useful variables to predict CVD risk beyond adiposity. In this review, we will discuss the complex and disparate effects of obesity on CVD, particularly focusing on whether, under given circumstances, it could be harmful, potentially harmless or neutral, or even possibly protective.

KW - Cardiometabolic syndrome

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Metabolically healthy obesity

KW - Obesity

KW - Obesity paradox

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044864955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044864955&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/eurheartj/ehv509

DO - 10.1093/eurheartj/ehv509

M3 - Review article

C2 - 26685971

AN - SCOPUS:85044864955

VL - 37

SP - 3560

EP - 3568

JO - European Heart Journal

JF - European Heart Journal

SN - 0195-668X

IS - 48

ER -