Object recognition in humans and machines

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The question of how humans learn, represent and recognize objects has been one of the core questions in cognitive research. With the advent of the field of computer vision - most notably through the seminal work of David Marr - it seemed that the solution lay in a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the environment (Marr 1982, see also one of the first computer vision systems built by Roberts et al. 1965). The success of this approach, however, was limited both in terms of explaining experimental results emerging from cognitive research as well as in enabling computer systems to recognize objects with a performance similar to humans.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationObject Recognition, Attention, and Action
PublisherSpringer Japan
Pages89-104
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9784431730194, 9784431730187
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

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Artificial Intelligence
Computer Systems
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Wallraven, C., & Bulthoff, H. (2007). Object recognition in humans and machines. In Object Recognition, Attention, and Action (pp. 89-104). Springer Japan. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-73019-4_7

Object recognition in humans and machines. / Wallraven, Christian; Bulthoff, Heinrich.

Object Recognition, Attention, and Action. Springer Japan, 2007. p. 89-104.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Wallraven, C & Bulthoff, H 2007, Object recognition in humans and machines. in Object Recognition, Attention, and Action. Springer Japan, pp. 89-104. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-73019-4_7
Wallraven C, Bulthoff H. Object recognition in humans and machines. In Object Recognition, Attention, and Action. Springer Japan. 2007. p. 89-104 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-73019-4_7
Wallraven, Christian ; Bulthoff, Heinrich. / Object recognition in humans and machines. Object Recognition, Attention, and Action. Springer Japan, 2007. pp. 89-104
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