Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A child is not just a small adult

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19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), like adult OSAS, is characterized by intermittent upper airway collapse during sleep and is associated with anatomic and neuromuscular factors. However, the clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and polysomnographic findings of OSAS in children are likely to be different from those in adults. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics that distinguish the clinical manifestations and polysomnographic findings of OSAS in children from those in adults. Methods: The study population consisted of 34 children (mean age, 7.6 years; range, 4 to 16 years) with OSAS and 33 adults (mean age, 40.1 years; range, 18 to 58 years) with OSAS. We compared various clinical manifestations, such as body mass index, tonsil size, severity of symptoms and signs, and polysomnographic data, between these groups. Results: Obesity was more common among the adults, whereas tonsillar hypertrophy was more common among the children. There were significant differences between the groups in the severity of symptoms and signs, including witnessed apnea, daytime sleepiness, morning headache, memory reduction, and daytime fatigue. In the children with OSAS, slow-wave sleep was relatively well preserved, and respiratory events such as apnea and hypopnea occurred mainly during rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: The clinical manifestations and polysomnographic findings in children with OSAS differ from those in adults with OSAS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)656-661
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume119
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Oct 1

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Sleep
Apnea
Signs and Symptoms
Palatine Tonsil
REM Sleep
Hypertrophy
Fatigue
Headache
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Child
  • Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome
  • Palatine tonsil
  • Polysomnography
  • Sign
  • Symptom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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title = "Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: A child is not just a small adult",
abstract = "Objectives: Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), like adult OSAS, is characterized by intermittent upper airway collapse during sleep and is associated with anatomic and neuromuscular factors. However, the clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and polysomnographic findings of OSAS in children are likely to be different from those in adults. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics that distinguish the clinical manifestations and polysomnographic findings of OSAS in children from those in adults. Methods: The study population consisted of 34 children (mean age, 7.6 years; range, 4 to 16 years) with OSAS and 33 adults (mean age, 40.1 years; range, 18 to 58 years) with OSAS. We compared various clinical manifestations, such as body mass index, tonsil size, severity of symptoms and signs, and polysomnographic data, between these groups. Results: Obesity was more common among the adults, whereas tonsillar hypertrophy was more common among the children. There were significant differences between the groups in the severity of symptoms and signs, including witnessed apnea, daytime sleepiness, morning headache, memory reduction, and daytime fatigue. In the children with OSAS, slow-wave sleep was relatively well preserved, and respiratory events such as apnea and hypopnea occurred mainly during rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: The clinical manifestations and polysomnographic findings in children with OSAS differ from those in adults with OSAS.",
keywords = "Body mass index, Child, Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, Palatine tonsil, Polysomnography, Sign, Symptom",
author = "Choi, {Ji Ho} and Kim, {Eun Joong} and June Choi and Kwon, {Soon Young} and Tae-Hoon Kim and Lee, {Sang Hag} and Lee, {Heung Man} and Chol Shin and Lee, {Seung Hoon}",
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T1 - Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

T2 - A child is not just a small adult

AU - Choi, Ji Ho

AU - Kim, Eun Joong

AU - Choi, June

AU - Kwon, Soon Young

AU - Kim, Tae-Hoon

AU - Lee, Sang Hag

AU - Lee, Heung Man

AU - Shin, Chol

AU - Lee, Seung Hoon

PY - 2010/10/1

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N2 - Objectives: Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), like adult OSAS, is characterized by intermittent upper airway collapse during sleep and is associated with anatomic and neuromuscular factors. However, the clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and polysomnographic findings of OSAS in children are likely to be different from those in adults. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics that distinguish the clinical manifestations and polysomnographic findings of OSAS in children from those in adults. Methods: The study population consisted of 34 children (mean age, 7.6 years; range, 4 to 16 years) with OSAS and 33 adults (mean age, 40.1 years; range, 18 to 58 years) with OSAS. We compared various clinical manifestations, such as body mass index, tonsil size, severity of symptoms and signs, and polysomnographic data, between these groups. Results: Obesity was more common among the adults, whereas tonsillar hypertrophy was more common among the children. There were significant differences between the groups in the severity of symptoms and signs, including witnessed apnea, daytime sleepiness, morning headache, memory reduction, and daytime fatigue. In the children with OSAS, slow-wave sleep was relatively well preserved, and respiratory events such as apnea and hypopnea occurred mainly during rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: The clinical manifestations and polysomnographic findings in children with OSAS differ from those in adults with OSAS.

AB - Objectives: Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), like adult OSAS, is characterized by intermittent upper airway collapse during sleep and is associated with anatomic and neuromuscular factors. However, the clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, and polysomnographic findings of OSAS in children are likely to be different from those in adults. The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics that distinguish the clinical manifestations and polysomnographic findings of OSAS in children from those in adults. Methods: The study population consisted of 34 children (mean age, 7.6 years; range, 4 to 16 years) with OSAS and 33 adults (mean age, 40.1 years; range, 18 to 58 years) with OSAS. We compared various clinical manifestations, such as body mass index, tonsil size, severity of symptoms and signs, and polysomnographic data, between these groups. Results: Obesity was more common among the adults, whereas tonsillar hypertrophy was more common among the children. There were significant differences between the groups in the severity of symptoms and signs, including witnessed apnea, daytime sleepiness, morning headache, memory reduction, and daytime fatigue. In the children with OSAS, slow-wave sleep was relatively well preserved, and respiratory events such as apnea and hypopnea occurred mainly during rapid eye movement sleep. Conclusions: The clinical manifestations and polysomnographic findings in children with OSAS differ from those in adults with OSAS.

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