Occupational hierarchy, economic sector, and mortality from cardiovascular disease among men and women findings from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study

Carles Muntaner, Paul Sorlie, Patricia O'Campo, Norman Johnson, Eric Backlund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Although socioeconomic position has been identified as a determinant of cardiovascular disease among employed men and women in the U.S., the role of economic sector in shaping this relationship has yet to be examined. We sought to estimate the combined effects of economic sector-one of the three major sectors of the economy: finance, government and production-and socioeconomic position on cardiovascular mortality among employed men and women. METHODS: Approximately 375,000 men and women 25 years of age or more were identified from selected Current Population Surveys between 1979 and 1985. These persons were followed for cardiovascular mortality through use of the National Death Index for the years 1979 through 1989. RESULTS: In men, the lowest cardiovascular mortality was found for professionals in the finance sector (76/100,000 person/years). The highest cardiovascular mortality was found among male non-professional workers in the production sector (192/100,000 person years). A different pattern was observed among women. Professional women in the finance sector had the highest rates of cardiovascular mortality (133/100,000 person years). For both men and women, the professional/non-professional gap in cardiovascular mortality was lower in the government sector than in the production and finance sectors. These associations were strong even after adjustment for age, race and income. CONCLUSIONS: Characteristics of government, finance and production work differentially influence the risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. Men, women, professionals and non-professionals experience this risk differently.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-201
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Mar 14
Externally publishedYes

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Longitudinal Studies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Economics
Mortality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Occupational hierarchy, economic sector, and mortality from cardiovascular disease among men and women findings from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study. / Muntaner, Carles; Sorlie, Paul; O'Campo, Patricia; Johnson, Norman; Backlund, Eric.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, Vol. 11, No. 3, 14.03.2001, p. 194-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muntaner, Carles ; Sorlie, Paul ; O'Campo, Patricia ; Johnson, Norman ; Backlund, Eric. / Occupational hierarchy, economic sector, and mortality from cardiovascular disease among men and women findings from the National Longitudinal Mortality Study. In: Annals of Epidemiology. 2001 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 194-201.
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