Oil components modulate physical characteristics and function of the natural oil emulsions as drug or gene delivery system

Hesson Chung, Tae Woo Kim, Miyun Kwon, Ick Chan Kwon, Seo Young Jeong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oil-in-water (o/w) type lipid emulsions were formulated by using 18 different natural oils and egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC) to investigate how emulsion particle size and stability change with different oils. Cottonseed, linseed and evening primrose oils formed emulsions with very large and unstable particles. Squalene, light mineral oil and jojoba bean oil formed stable emulsions with small particles. The remaining natural oils formed moderately stable emulsions. Emulsions with smaller initial particle size were more stable than those with larger particles. The correlation between emulsion size made with different oils and two physical properties of the oils was also investigated. The o/w interfacial tension and particle size of the emulsion were inversely proportional. The effect of viscosity was less pronounced. To study how the oil component in the emulsion modulates the in vitro release characteristics of lipophilic drugs, three different emulsions loaded with two different drugs were prepared. Squalene, soybean oil and linseed oil emulsions represented the most, medium and the least stable systems, respectively. For the lipophilic drugs, release was the slowest from the most stable squalene emulsion, followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Cationic emulsions were also prepared with the above three different oils as gene carriers. In vitro transfection activity was the highest for the most stable squalene emulsion followed by soybean oil and then by linseed oil emulsions. Even though the in vitro transfection activity of emulsions were lower than the liposome in the absence of serum, the activity of squalene emulsion, for instance, was ca. 30 times higher than that of liposome in the presence of 80% (v/v) serum. In conclusion, the choice of oil component in o/w emulsion is important in formulating emulsion-based drug or gene delivery systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)339-350
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Controlled Release
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001 Apr 28

Keywords

  • Cationic lipid
  • Egg phosphatidylcholine
  • Interfacial tension
  • Squalene
  • Stability
  • Transfection
  • Vegetable and animal oils

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

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