Olfactory dysfunctions in drug-naïve Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment

Jin Woo Park, Do-Young Kwon, Ji Ho Choi, Moon Ho Park, Ho-Kyoung Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Evaluation of olfactory function is valuable for the detection of pre-motor state of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients have an increased risk of associated dementia and one-third of PD patients have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at the time of diagnosis. However, the characteristics of olfactory dysfunction in PD-MCI patients are unclear. This study examined the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and cognitive function in drug-naïve PD at the time of diagnosis with the patterns of olfactory function in PD-MCI patients using the Korean version of the Sniffin’ stick test II (KVSS II). Methods A total of 66 drug-naïve PD patients were enrolled. A neuropsychiatric assessment battery and KVSS II were performed. For the statistical analyses, univariate, multivariable linear regression and Student's t-test were used to determine the relationship between the variables and olfactory function. Results Olfactory dysfunction was more prevalent in the PD-MCI group than in the PD-normal cognition (PD-CN) group. Each domains of odor threshold, discrimination, identification and total olfactory score were more impaired in the PD-MCI group than the PD-CN group. Whether cognitive impairment was single or multiple domain was not affected. Conclusion PD-MCI is more likely to be associated with severe olfactory impairment than PD-CN. There may be more extensive neurodegenerative processes affecting olfaction in PD-MCI patients. With further investigation and validation using neuropathological data, an objective olfactory function test could be used as a tool to evaluate disease progression. Further studies with prospective design investigating the prognostic value of olfactory dysfunction in PD-MCI patients are essential.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-73
Number of pages5
JournalParkinsonism and Related Disorders
Volume46
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1

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Parkinson Disease
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognition
Smell
Dementia
Disease Progression
Linear Models
Prospective Studies
Students

Keywords

  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Olfactory dysfunction
  • Parkinson's disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Olfactory dysfunctions in drug-naïve Parkinson's disease with mild cognitive impairment. / Park, Jin Woo; Kwon, Do-Young; Choi, Ji Ho; Park, Moon Ho; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung.

In: Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, Vol. 46, 01.01.2018, p. 69-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background Evaluation of olfactory function is valuable for the detection of pre-motor state of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients have an increased risk of associated dementia and one-third of PD patients have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at the time of diagnosis. However, the characteristics of olfactory dysfunction in PD-MCI patients are unclear. This study examined the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and cognitive function in drug-na{\"i}ve PD at the time of diagnosis with the patterns of olfactory function in PD-MCI patients using the Korean version of the Sniffin’ stick test II (KVSS II). Methods A total of 66 drug-na{\"i}ve PD patients were enrolled. A neuropsychiatric assessment battery and KVSS II were performed. For the statistical analyses, univariate, multivariable linear regression and Student's t-test were used to determine the relationship between the variables and olfactory function. Results Olfactory dysfunction was more prevalent in the PD-MCI group than in the PD-normal cognition (PD-CN) group. Each domains of odor threshold, discrimination, identification and total olfactory score were more impaired in the PD-MCI group than the PD-CN group. Whether cognitive impairment was single or multiple domain was not affected. Conclusion PD-MCI is more likely to be associated with severe olfactory impairment than PD-CN. There may be more extensive neurodegenerative processes affecting olfaction in PD-MCI patients. With further investigation and validation using neuropathological data, an objective olfactory function test could be used as a tool to evaluate disease progression. Further studies with prospective design investigating the prognostic value of olfactory dysfunction in PD-MCI patients are essential.",
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N2 - Background Evaluation of olfactory function is valuable for the detection of pre-motor state of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients have an increased risk of associated dementia and one-third of PD patients have mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at the time of diagnosis. However, the characteristics of olfactory dysfunction in PD-MCI patients are unclear. This study examined the relationship between olfactory dysfunction and cognitive function in drug-naïve PD at the time of diagnosis with the patterns of olfactory function in PD-MCI patients using the Korean version of the Sniffin’ stick test II (KVSS II). Methods A total of 66 drug-naïve PD patients were enrolled. A neuropsychiatric assessment battery and KVSS II were performed. For the statistical analyses, univariate, multivariable linear regression and Student's t-test were used to determine the relationship between the variables and olfactory function. Results Olfactory dysfunction was more prevalent in the PD-MCI group than in the PD-normal cognition (PD-CN) group. Each domains of odor threshold, discrimination, identification and total olfactory score were more impaired in the PD-MCI group than the PD-CN group. Whether cognitive impairment was single or multiple domain was not affected. Conclusion PD-MCI is more likely to be associated with severe olfactory impairment than PD-CN. There may be more extensive neurodegenerative processes affecting olfaction in PD-MCI patients. With further investigation and validation using neuropathological data, an objective olfactory function test could be used as a tool to evaluate disease progression. Further studies with prospective design investigating the prognostic value of olfactory dysfunction in PD-MCI patients are essential.

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