Open-closed switching of synthetic tubular pores

Yongju Kim, Jiheong Kang, Bowen Shen, Yanqiu Wang, Ying He, Myongsoo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While encouraging progress has been made on switchable nanopores to mimic biological channels and pores, it remains a great challenge to realize long tubular pores with a dynamic open-closed motion. Here we report μm-long, dynamic tubular pores that undergo rapid switching between open and closed states in response to a thermal signal in water. The tubular walls consist of laterally associated primary fibrils stacked from disc-shaped molecules in which the discs readily tilt by means of thermally regulated dehydration of the oligoether chains placed on the wall surfaces. Notably, this pore switching mediates a controlled water-pumping catalytic action for the dehydrative cyclization of adenosine monophosphate to produce metabolically active cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We believe that our work may allow the creation of a variety of dynamic pore structures with complex functions arising from open-closed motion.

Original languageEnglish
Article number8650
JournalNature communications
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Oct 12
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nanopores
porosity
Water
Cyclization
Adenosine Monophosphate
Dehydration
Cyclic AMP
Hot Temperature
Pore structure
cyclic AMP
adenosine monophosphate
Molecules
dehydration
water
pumping
molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Open-closed switching of synthetic tubular pores. / Kim, Yongju; Kang, Jiheong; Shen, Bowen; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ying; Lee, Myongsoo.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 6, 8650, 12.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Yongju ; Kang, Jiheong ; Shen, Bowen ; Wang, Yanqiu ; He, Ying ; Lee, Myongsoo. / Open-closed switching of synthetic tubular pores. In: Nature communications. 2015 ; Vol. 6.
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