Optimal retraining time for regaining functional fitness using multicomponent training after long-term detraining in older adults

Minyoung Lee, Taehyun Lim, Jaehyuk Lee, Kimyeong Kim, Bum-Chul Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives Little is known about the optimal retraining time for regaining functional fitness through multicomponent training following long-term detraining in older adults. This study first investigated the time course of functional fitness changes during 12-month multicomponent training, 12-month detraining, and 9-month retraining in 18 older adults (68.33 ± 3.46) and then determined the optimal retraining time for regaining the post-training functional fitness level after a 12-month detraining period. Methods Functional fitness, including lower and upper limb strength, lower and upper limb flexibility, aerobic endurance, and dynamic balance, was assessed at baseline, 12 months post-training, 12 months post-detraining, and 3, 6, and 9 months post-retraining. Results There were significant increases in all of the functional fitness components except upper limb flexibility at post-training and no significant decreases at post-detraining. For lower and upper limb strength and lower limb flexibility, a 3-month period was required to regain the post-training condition. For aerobic endurance and dynamic balance, a retraining period ≥9 months was necessary to regain the post-training functional fitness condition. Conclusions To regain the post-training condition of all functional fitness components, a retraining period ≥9 months was required. This information might be useful for health professionals to encourage older adults not to interrupt retraining until they regain their post-training functional fitness condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-233
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume73
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Nov 1

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retraining
fitness
Lower Extremity
flexibility
endurance
Upper Extremity
time
Health
health professionals

Keywords

  • Detraining
  • Functional fitness
  • Multicomponent training
  • Older adults
  • Retraining

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Ageing
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Optimal retraining time for regaining functional fitness using multicomponent training after long-term detraining in older adults. / Lee, Minyoung; Lim, Taehyun; Lee, Jaehyuk; Kim, Kimyeong; Yoon, Bum-Chul.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 73, 01.11.2017, p. 227-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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