Organizational response to workplace violence, and its association with depressive symptoms

A nationwide survey of 1966 Korean EMS providers

Ji Hwan Kim, Nagyeong Lee, Ja Young Kim, Soo Jin Kim, Cassandra Okechukwu, Seung-Sup Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether organizational responses modified the associations between experiencing violence and depressive symptoms among emergency workers. METHODS: A nationwide survey of 1966 Korean emergency medical service (EMS) providers was analyzed. Experience of workplace violence (ie, physical violence, verbal abuse) was classified into four groups based on the victims' reporting and organizational responses: (i) "Not experienced," (ii) "Experienced, not reported," (iii) "Experienced, reported, responded by organization,"and (iv) "Experienced, reported, not responded by organization." Depressive symptoms were assessed by 11-item version of the Centers for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. RESULTS: Compared to "Not experienced" group, physical violence was significantly associated with depressive symptoms among EMS providers responding "Experienced, not reported" (PR: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.37, 2.03) and "Experienced, reported, not responded by organization" (PR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.75, 3.82), after adjusting for confounders. No significant difference was detected for workers responding "Experienced, reported, responded by organization" group (PR: 1.45, 95% CI: 0.87, 2.41). Similar trends were observed in the analysis with verbal abuse. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that organizational responses could play a critical role in mitigating depressive symptoms among EMS providers who experience violence at work.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-109
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Occupational Health
Volume61
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

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Workplace Violence
Emergency Medical Services
Depression
Organizations
Violence
Epidemiologic Studies
Emergencies
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • depressive symptoms
  • organizational response
  • South Korea
  • workplace violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Organizational response to workplace violence, and its association with depressive symptoms : A nationwide survey of 1966 Korean EMS providers. / Kim, Ji Hwan; Lee, Nagyeong; Kim, Ja Young; Kim, Soo Jin; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Kim, Seung-Sup.

In: Journal of Occupational Health, Vol. 61, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 101-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Ji Hwan ; Lee, Nagyeong ; Kim, Ja Young ; Kim, Soo Jin ; Okechukwu, Cassandra ; Kim, Seung-Sup. / Organizational response to workplace violence, and its association with depressive symptoms : A nationwide survey of 1966 Korean EMS providers. In: Journal of Occupational Health. 2019 ; Vol. 61, No. 1. pp. 101-109.
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