Paleomagnetism and U-Pb geochronology of the late Cretaceous Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation, Korea

Tectonic evolution of the Korean Peninsula

Doohee Jeong, Yongjae Yu, Seong-Jae Doh, Dongwoo Suk, Jeongmin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Late Cretaceous Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation (CVF) in southeastern Korea contains four ash-flow ignimbrite units (A1, A2, A3, and A4) and three intervening volcano-sedimentary layers (S1, S2, and S3). Reliable U-Pb ages obtained for zircons from the base and top of the CVF were 72.8 ± 1.7 Ma and 67.7 ± 2.1 Ma, respectively. Paleomagnetic analysis on pyroclastic units yielded mean magnetic directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) as D/I = 19.1° /49.2° (a<inf>95</inf> = 4.2°, k = 76.5) and VGP = 73.1 °N/232.1 °E (A<inf>95</inf> = 3.7°, N = 3) for A1, D/I = 24.9° /52.9° (a<inf>95</inf> = 5.9°, k = 61.7) and VGP = 69.4°N/217.3°E (A<inf>95</inf> = 5.6°, N = 11) for A3, and D/I = 10.9° /50.1° (a<inf>95</inf> = 5.6°, k = 38.6) and VGP = 79.8°N/242.4°E (A<inf>95</inf> = 5.0°, N = 18) for A4. Our best estimates of the paleopoles for A1, A3, and A4 are in remarkable agreement with the reference apparent polar wander path of China in late Cretaceous to early Paleogene, confirming that Korea has been rigidly attached to China (by implication to Eurasia) at least since the Cretaceous. The compiled paleomagnetic data of the Korean Peninsula suggest that the mode of clockwise rotations weakened since the mid-Jurassic. Such interesting variation of vertical rotations in the Korean Peninsula might result from the strike-slip motions of major faults developed in East Asia (the Tancheng-Lujiang fault to the northwest and the Korea-Taiwan strait fault to the southeast), near-field tectonic forcing of the subducting Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian Plate, and far-field expressions of the India-Asia collision.

Original languageEnglish
Article number66
JournalEarth, Planets and Space
Volume67
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Dec 27

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paleomagnetism
virtual geomagnetic pole
geochronology
Korea
peninsulas
tectonic evolution
volcanology
tectonics
poles
Cretaceous
China
apparent polar wander path
straits
ash flow
igneous rocks
Eurasian plate
ignimbrite
Pacific plate
Taiwan
ashes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Paleomagnetism and U-Pb geochronology of the late Cretaceous Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation, Korea : Tectonic evolution of the Korean Peninsula. / Jeong, Doohee; Yu, Yongjae; Doh, Seong-Jae; Suk, Dongwoo; Kim, Jeongmin.

In: Earth, Planets and Space, Vol. 67, No. 1, 66, 27.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Late Cretaceous Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation (CVF) in southeastern Korea contains four ash-flow ignimbrite units (A1, A2, A3, and A4) and three intervening volcano-sedimentary layers (S1, S2, and S3). Reliable U-Pb ages obtained for zircons from the base and top of the CVF were 72.8 ± 1.7 Ma and 67.7 ± 2.1 Ma, respectively. Paleomagnetic analysis on pyroclastic units yielded mean magnetic directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) as D/I = 19.1° /49.2° (a95 = 4.2°, k = 76.5) and VGP = 73.1 °N/232.1 °E (A95 = 3.7°, N = 3) for A1, D/I = 24.9° /52.9° (a95 = 5.9°, k = 61.7) and VGP = 69.4°N/217.3°E (A95 = 5.6°, N = 11) for A3, and D/I = 10.9° /50.1° (a95 = 5.6°, k = 38.6) and VGP = 79.8°N/242.4°E (A95 = 5.0°, N = 18) for A4. Our best estimates of the paleopoles for A1, A3, and A4 are in remarkable agreement with the reference apparent polar wander path of China in late Cretaceous to early Paleogene, confirming that Korea has been rigidly attached to China (by implication to Eurasia) at least since the Cretaceous. The compiled paleomagnetic data of the Korean Peninsula suggest that the mode of clockwise rotations weakened since the mid-Jurassic. Such interesting variation of vertical rotations in the Korean Peninsula might result from the strike-slip motions of major faults developed in East Asia (the Tancheng-Lujiang fault to the northwest and the Korea-Taiwan strait fault to the southeast), near-field tectonic forcing of the subducting Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian Plate, and far-field expressions of the India-Asia collision.",
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AU - Suk, Dongwoo

AU - Kim, Jeongmin

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N2 - Late Cretaceous Chisulryoung Volcanic Formation (CVF) in southeastern Korea contains four ash-flow ignimbrite units (A1, A2, A3, and A4) and three intervening volcano-sedimentary layers (S1, S2, and S3). Reliable U-Pb ages obtained for zircons from the base and top of the CVF were 72.8 ± 1.7 Ma and 67.7 ± 2.1 Ma, respectively. Paleomagnetic analysis on pyroclastic units yielded mean magnetic directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) as D/I = 19.1° /49.2° (a95 = 4.2°, k = 76.5) and VGP = 73.1 °N/232.1 °E (A95 = 3.7°, N = 3) for A1, D/I = 24.9° /52.9° (a95 = 5.9°, k = 61.7) and VGP = 69.4°N/217.3°E (A95 = 5.6°, N = 11) for A3, and D/I = 10.9° /50.1° (a95 = 5.6°, k = 38.6) and VGP = 79.8°N/242.4°E (A95 = 5.0°, N = 18) for A4. Our best estimates of the paleopoles for A1, A3, and A4 are in remarkable agreement with the reference apparent polar wander path of China in late Cretaceous to early Paleogene, confirming that Korea has been rigidly attached to China (by implication to Eurasia) at least since the Cretaceous. The compiled paleomagnetic data of the Korean Peninsula suggest that the mode of clockwise rotations weakened since the mid-Jurassic. Such interesting variation of vertical rotations in the Korean Peninsula might result from the strike-slip motions of major faults developed in East Asia (the Tancheng-Lujiang fault to the northwest and the Korea-Taiwan strait fault to the southeast), near-field tectonic forcing of the subducting Pacific Plate beneath the Eurasian Plate, and far-field expressions of the India-Asia collision.

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