Perceiving translucent materials

Roland W. Fleming, Henrik Wann Jensen, Heinrich Bulthoff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many common materials, including fruit, wax and human skin, are somewhat translucent. What makes an object look translucent or opaque? Here we use a recently developed computer graphics model of subsurface light transport [Jensen, et al., 2001] to study the factors that determine perceived translucency. We discuss how physical factors, such as light-source direction can alter the apparent translucency of an object, finding that objects are perceived to be more translucent when illuminated from behind than in front. We also study the role of a range of image cues, including colour, contrast and blur, in the perception of translucency. Although we learn a lot about images of translucent materials, we find that many simple candidate sources of information fail to predict how translucent an object looks. We suggest that the visual system does not rely solely on these simple image statistics to estimate translucency: the relevant stimulus information remains to be discovered.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004
EditorsS.N. Spencer
Pages127-134
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 2004 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004 - Los Angeles, CA, United States
Duration: 2004 Aug 72004 Aug 8

Other

OtherProceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles, CA
Period04/8/704/8/8

Fingerprint

Waxes
Computer graphics
Fruits
Light sources
Skin
Statistics
Color

Keywords

  • Perception
  • Psychophysics
  • Subsurface scattering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Fleming, R. W., Jensen, H. W., & Bulthoff, H. (2004). Perceiving translucent materials. In S. N. Spencer (Ed.), Proceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004 (pp. 127-134)

Perceiving translucent materials. / Fleming, Roland W.; Jensen, Henrik Wann; Bulthoff, Heinrich.

Proceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004. ed. / S.N. Spencer. 2004. p. 127-134.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Fleming, RW, Jensen, HW & Bulthoff, H 2004, Perceiving translucent materials. in SN Spencer (ed.), Proceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004. pp. 127-134, Proceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004, Los Angeles, CA, United States, 04/8/7.
Fleming RW, Jensen HW, Bulthoff H. Perceiving translucent materials. In Spencer SN, editor, Proceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004. 2004. p. 127-134
Fleming, Roland W. ; Jensen, Henrik Wann ; Bulthoff, Heinrich. / Perceiving translucent materials. Proceedings - 1st Symposium on Applied Perception in Graphics and Visualization, APGV 2004. editor / S.N. Spencer. 2004. pp. 127-134
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