Percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle: A surgical technique to aid the reduction with nail assistance

Hyun Joo Lee, Chang Wug Oh, Jong-Keon Oh, Jong Pil Yoon, Joon Woo Kim, Sang Bong Na, Hee Soo Kyung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Due to the complex anatomy of the clavicle, percutaneous plating with indirect reduction for comminuted midshaft fracture of the clavicle is challenging. The aim of this series was to report on a novel technique of nail-assisted percutaneous plating and to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes in comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle. Materials and methods: Between 2009 and 2010, with nail assistance for the reduction and its maintenance, percutaneous plating was performed in 14 patients with comminuted midshaft fracture of the clavicle. The mean follow-up period was 17.6 months (range, 15-31 months). A retrospective review of the clinical and radiologic results for these patients was conducted. Results: All fractures healed within a mean period of 15.6 weeks (range, 11-18 weeks) without loss of reduction. Regarding complications, there was no occurrence of implant failure or infection. All patients showed excellent shoulder function, with a mean Constant shoulder score of 99, and a mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score of 4.2 (range, 0-22) at the latest follow-up. No significant difference in mean proportional length was observed between injured and uninjured clavicles, with a mean of 0.4% (range, -1.5% to 2.4%). Conclusions: Minimally invasive percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle, combining the advantages of elastic intramedullary nailing and percutaneous plating, may be a good option.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-470
Number of pages6
JournalInjury
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Apr 1

Fingerprint

Comminuted Fractures
Clavicle
Nails
Intramedullary Fracture Fixation
Anatomy
Arm
Hand
Maintenance
Infection

Keywords

  • Clavicle midshaft fracture
  • Comminuted
  • Nail-assisted
  • Percutaneous plating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle : A surgical technique to aid the reduction with nail assistance. / Lee, Hyun Joo; Oh, Chang Wug; Oh, Jong-Keon; Yoon, Jong Pil; Kim, Joon Woo; Na, Sang Bong; Kyung, Hee Soo.

In: Injury, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 465-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Hyun Joo ; Oh, Chang Wug ; Oh, Jong-Keon ; Yoon, Jong Pil ; Kim, Joon Woo ; Na, Sang Bong ; Kyung, Hee Soo. / Percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle : A surgical technique to aid the reduction with nail assistance. In: Injury. 2013 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 465-470.
@article{9396515918cd40eaaca582ecfdd3e620,
title = "Percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle: A surgical technique to aid the reduction with nail assistance",
abstract = "Introduction: Due to the complex anatomy of the clavicle, percutaneous plating with indirect reduction for comminuted midshaft fracture of the clavicle is challenging. The aim of this series was to report on a novel technique of nail-assisted percutaneous plating and to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes in comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle. Materials and methods: Between 2009 and 2010, with nail assistance for the reduction and its maintenance, percutaneous plating was performed in 14 patients with comminuted midshaft fracture of the clavicle. The mean follow-up period was 17.6 months (range, 15-31 months). A retrospective review of the clinical and radiologic results for these patients was conducted. Results: All fractures healed within a mean period of 15.6 weeks (range, 11-18 weeks) without loss of reduction. Regarding complications, there was no occurrence of implant failure or infection. All patients showed excellent shoulder function, with a mean Constant shoulder score of 99, and a mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score of 4.2 (range, 0-22) at the latest follow-up. No significant difference in mean proportional length was observed between injured and uninjured clavicles, with a mean of 0.4{\%} (range, -1.5{\%} to 2.4{\%}). Conclusions: Minimally invasive percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle, combining the advantages of elastic intramedullary nailing and percutaneous plating, may be a good option.",
keywords = "Clavicle midshaft fracture, Comminuted, Nail-assisted, Percutaneous plating",
author = "Lee, {Hyun Joo} and Oh, {Chang Wug} and Jong-Keon Oh and Yoon, {Jong Pil} and Kim, {Joon Woo} and Na, {Sang Bong} and Kyung, {Hee Soo}",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.injury.2012.09.030",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "465--470",
journal = "Injury",
issn = "0020-1383",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle

T2 - A surgical technique to aid the reduction with nail assistance

AU - Lee, Hyun Joo

AU - Oh, Chang Wug

AU - Oh, Jong-Keon

AU - Yoon, Jong Pil

AU - Kim, Joon Woo

AU - Na, Sang Bong

AU - Kyung, Hee Soo

PY - 2013/4/1

Y1 - 2013/4/1

N2 - Introduction: Due to the complex anatomy of the clavicle, percutaneous plating with indirect reduction for comminuted midshaft fracture of the clavicle is challenging. The aim of this series was to report on a novel technique of nail-assisted percutaneous plating and to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes in comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle. Materials and methods: Between 2009 and 2010, with nail assistance for the reduction and its maintenance, percutaneous plating was performed in 14 patients with comminuted midshaft fracture of the clavicle. The mean follow-up period was 17.6 months (range, 15-31 months). A retrospective review of the clinical and radiologic results for these patients was conducted. Results: All fractures healed within a mean period of 15.6 weeks (range, 11-18 weeks) without loss of reduction. Regarding complications, there was no occurrence of implant failure or infection. All patients showed excellent shoulder function, with a mean Constant shoulder score of 99, and a mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score of 4.2 (range, 0-22) at the latest follow-up. No significant difference in mean proportional length was observed between injured and uninjured clavicles, with a mean of 0.4% (range, -1.5% to 2.4%). Conclusions: Minimally invasive percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle, combining the advantages of elastic intramedullary nailing and percutaneous plating, may be a good option.

AB - Introduction: Due to the complex anatomy of the clavicle, percutaneous plating with indirect reduction for comminuted midshaft fracture of the clavicle is challenging. The aim of this series was to report on a novel technique of nail-assisted percutaneous plating and to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes in comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle. Materials and methods: Between 2009 and 2010, with nail assistance for the reduction and its maintenance, percutaneous plating was performed in 14 patients with comminuted midshaft fracture of the clavicle. The mean follow-up period was 17.6 months (range, 15-31 months). A retrospective review of the clinical and radiologic results for these patients was conducted. Results: All fractures healed within a mean period of 15.6 weeks (range, 11-18 weeks) without loss of reduction. Regarding complications, there was no occurrence of implant failure or infection. All patients showed excellent shoulder function, with a mean Constant shoulder score of 99, and a mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score of 4.2 (range, 0-22) at the latest follow-up. No significant difference in mean proportional length was observed between injured and uninjured clavicles, with a mean of 0.4% (range, -1.5% to 2.4%). Conclusions: Minimally invasive percutaneous plating for comminuted midshaft fractures of the clavicle, combining the advantages of elastic intramedullary nailing and percutaneous plating, may be a good option.

KW - Clavicle midshaft fracture

KW - Comminuted

KW - Nail-assisted

KW - Percutaneous plating

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875226164&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875226164&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.injury.2012.09.030

DO - 10.1016/j.injury.2012.09.030

M3 - Article

C2 - 23116648

AN - SCOPUS:84875226164

VL - 44

SP - 465

EP - 470

JO - Injury

JF - Injury

SN - 0020-1383

IS - 4

ER -